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Taralist Time Activated Relay Controllers

Introduction

Taralist time activated relay controllers offer a low-cost solution for controlling relays based on a time schedule that is loaded into the relay controller from a PC.  Taralist series controllers use our Base Station software to manage all time scheduling operations.  Taralist controllers allow you to build an event list, which is processed every second, as it looks for time schedule match.  Each event has a priority, so events at the bottom of the list are executed last, and therefore have the highest priority over events in the top of the list.  Taralist controllers are also capable of processing daylight savings time events, allowing trouble-free time compensation for U.S. time schedule changes.  Taralist controllers are equipped with a battery backed real time clock (RTC).  Like all RTCs, time drift is a natural occurrence.  Our firmware allows you to automatically adjust the clock a few seconds periodically to help keep the controller’s time on schedule

REQUIREMENTS

All customers are STRONGLY ADVISED to purchase at least ONE USB Communication Module.  This communication module may be used to recover a controller or to reconfigure a controller should there be an accidental loss of communications.  NCD Tech support may be unable to assist customers who do not have a USB Communications Module available for troubleshooting purposes.  Please purchase at least one USB Communications Module from our store before continuing.

IMPORTANT

Taralist firmware has been re-written.
If your controller is identified as a ‘Taralist Enhanced’ in Base Station software, then your controller is capable of accepting commands at high communications speeds.  Older versions of the firmware will require a 1ms delay between communication bytes.  NCD STRONGLY ENCOURAGE A FIRMWARE UPGRADE IF YOU ARE NOT USING TARALIST ENHANCED FIRMWARE.  Return your device to NCD, and we will upgrade your firmware free of charge including return shipment.

Notice

This manual will guide you through the setup and use of all Taralist Series relay controllers.  Following this manual in the sequence outlined is absolutely essential to proper understanding and use of Taralist Series Controllers.   Please review the entire manual BEFORE contacting NCD technical support.  NCD technical support staff will direct your questions to this manual when applicable.

Getting Started

The Taralist Series relay controllers represent a significant advancement in the evolution of the NCD product line.  The Taralist Series controllers represent many foundation technologies that will significantly strengthen our product offerings in the years to come.

The Taralist Series of controllers are the first time-controlled devices we have ever developed.  This new architecture allows powerful computer-based configuration without writing a single line of code.  Taralist controllers are the first to offer a Autonomous time controlled at any time, and even change settings in the configuration through a direct USB connection or using a wireless 802.15.4 or ZigBee Mesh Interface.  The Taralist Series are manufactured using Surface Mount Technology.  A Break Away design has been implemented to meet the requirements of customers who need an enclosure AND to customers who need the smallest possible size.  Break Away tabs allow the user to “break” off the outer edges of the circuit board for a smaller profile.  This type of controller in conjunction with several other “no programming required” devices represent the future direction of National Control Devices.

Who’s Qualified to Use the Taralist Series?

Anyone.  The Taralist Series Controllers are one of the most user-friendly devices we have ever manufactured.  Whether you are an electronics engineer or home hobbyist, anyone is qualified to use the Taralist Series controller provided this manual is carefully studied.

How do the Taralist Series Controllers Work?

The Taralist Series Relay Controllers are configured using a computer (either using wireless or a direct USB connection).  Once configured, a Taralist controller will operate without a computer.  At any time, a computer may monitor the Taralist Device, Activate Relays, or Change Configuration settings.  A computer can take over a Taralist or a Taralist can operate autonomously (without a computer).  The NCD Base Station software provides 1000 User Configurable events where a relay or group of relays can be turned on or off.  It’s that easy.

Once the Taralist is configured, it will run through the list of events sored in it’s on board memory every second to look for a match with the current time.  If a match with the current time and a configured event is discovered, it will execute the event.

Order of Operations

There is a general process to learning and using a Taralist Series relay controller, this manual will follow the two sequences, covering the Learning Cycle and the Usage Cycle.  Optionally, users may want to consider exploring the Advanced Applications to unlock some of the most powerful features.

Learning Cycle

  1. Hardware Reference (getting to know the hardware)
  2. Communications
  3. Configuration Overview
  4. Building a Custom Configuration Profile
  5. Loading and Saving Configuration Profiles
  6. Understanding Relay Control
  7. Testing a Taralist Controller
  8. Controlling Devices with a Taralist Controller
  9. Troubleshooting a Taralist Controller

Usage Cycle

  1. Configuration
  2. Testing
  3. External Device connection

Advanced Application

  1. Remote Configuration
  2. Using a Computer to Take Over a Relay
  3. Giving Relay Control Back to Taralist Logic
  4. Changing the Time Compensation
  5. Using the Midnight Buffer

Hardware Reference

There is no better place to start than from the beginning.  This guide will lead you through the understanding and use of you Taralist Series relay controller in a sequence that will help get you started from the ground up.

Before contacting NCD technical support, make sure that you have thoroughly read this guide.  Most questions will be covered in this guide and NCD technical support staff has been instructed to direct your questions to this manual when appropriate.  Please take advantage of the efforts we have invested in building a complete and comprehensive product manual.  This will save you time and allow our technical support engineers to focus on product development.

Onboard Battery Backup

Lithium Ion Battery Backup

Each Taralist controller has a battery installed on it.  This battery’s main purpose is to keep the Taralist clock running if power is disconnected; otherwise, every time you unplug and move the controller you would have to reset the time in it.  This battery will keep the Taralist clock running for up to two months, but there are some things you need to know.  The Taralist onboard battery backup is used to run the Taralist clock only, it will not allow the controller to function and process events.  You will not be able to run the controller on this battery alone, an external power source is required for processing events and controlling relays.

Charging the Onboard Battery

The onboard battery is charged when the device is attached to a power source.  You can control how fast the battery is charged by Editing Protected Data (later in this guide).  This is very useful as you can charge the battery very quickly or very slowly.  Charging the battery slowly will increase the battery’s life, so whenever possible we recommend leaving the Charge level to 1.

Getting the Best Life out of the Battery

It is recommended to charge the battery slowly.  Also make sure you have a power source plugged into the controller when a USB cable is connected to the device.  If a USB cable is attached to the device but no power supply is connected, this will drain the battery very quickly as the controller will not be able to properly enter sleep mode.

Understanding Outputs

Taralist Controllers are capable of controlling up to 256 Relays from only one Taralist CPU.  These controllers are available with 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 32 relays on a printed circuit board as well as a small controller with only an XR expansion port instead of relays.  XR Expansion Relays may be added to the XR Expansion Port at any time giving you as many relays as you need (up to 256).

A relay is similar to a switch.  The only difference between a switch and a relay is the actual mechanism for changing the on/off status of the switch.  On a switch, you manually push on a piece of metal or plastic to operate the switch.  On a relay, an electric current is used to operate the switch.  We will use the work “relay to indicate a switch that is controlled by the Taralist controller.

Relays do NOT provide a voltage output.  They provide a contact closure output, exactly like the terminals found on a light switch at your local hardware store.  Wiring to a relay will be slightly different depending on the model of Taralist controller you choose.

Some relays, such as the 5A and 10A versions, have a screw terminals that can accept 12 Gauge or smaller wire.  Other versions, such as the 20A and 30A relays, have a .250” Quick Connect terminal (the appropriate mating connector can be found at any hardware or automotive supply store).  Our 20A HP series relays will accept wires as large as 10 Gauge.

Again, relays do not provide a voltage output.  They ONLY switch whatever voltage you supply into the relay.

Relays are available in SPST, SPDT, and DPDT configurations.  In addition, both Mechanical and Solid State relays will be supported by the Taralist series.

If you intend to use the Taralist series relay controllers for inductive applications, this article MUST be reviewed. An example of an inductive application is any device that involves motion.  For instance, using a Taralist Controller to control a motor, a solenoid, or a valve.  Other types of inductive applications include anything with a transformer such as a fluorescent light or a power transformer of any kind.  Logic circuits (including those found on the Taralist Controller) may malfunction in sever conditions.  The above article will show you how to safely implement these kinds of loads which greatly reduces the chances of a malfunction.  Some inductive applications generate excessive noise, and may not be suitable for use with the Taralist Series Relay controllers.  Solid State Taralist Relay Controllers should be considered for these high-noise applications.

Controlling Relays

There are 2 possible ways to control the relays on a Taralist Series controller.

  1. A Relay can be Directly Controlled by an Event configured into the Taralist Device.
  2. A Relay can be controlled from a computer such as a ZigBee wireless interface, Ethernet Interface, or USB interface.  A computer can take control of any or all relays on a Taralist controller at any time.  Once taken over, the Taralist logic will not be able to switch a relay.  The computer MUST return control of the relay back to the Taralist Logic for stand-alone operation.  The default power-up status of a Taralist controller relays may be preset using the Midnight backup buffer.

Limitless Relay Control

A version of the ProXR firmware is used to control relays on the Taralist device.  This version is called ProXR Lite.  It has many of the same features as the original ProXR firmware, so if customers are familiar with original ProXR controllers, this device will be very easy to work with.

Break Away Tabs

Physically, most Taralist controllers are actually 2 sizes.  When you receive your Taralist controller, the shape and size ensures the controller can fit into a standard enclosure.  Optionally, you can make the controller smaller by breaking away the outer tabs.  Break-Away tabs are useful in applications where space may be a concern.  This allows your Taralist controller to offer the same functionality in the smallest possible profile.  Break-Away tabs are unique to the NCD product line and are a standard option for most devices released in 2010 and later.

Before breaking the tabs on your controller, please be advised that your Taralist controller will not be returnable for refund or credit if the Break-Away Tabs have been removed.

To break away the tabs, gently but firmly grab each break-away tab with a pair of pliers and bend the tab back and forth until it breaks away from the main circuit board.  This will NOT damage the controller in anyway.

Breaking the Tabs from a controller DOES NOT VOID the warranty.  Please see the NCD return policy if you would like more information on the policies that apply to Surface Mount devices.

Taralist shown above as shipped from National Control Devices.  The shape accommodates a standard enclosure.

Bend the Tables to break them away from the board.  Note that controllers with Broken Tabs are NOT Returnable for Refund or Credit, but are still covered under our Limited Warranty.

Shown here, the final controller with tabs removed is physical smaller in size, but no longer fits a standard enclosure.

Taralist Configuration

Establishing communications with a Taralist controller is an essential step in using this device.  Taralist Series controllers are available in many different varieties.  While all controllers are capable of functioning WITHOUT a computer, a computer is REQUIRED to configure the Taralist controller.

The way the Taralist controller communicates with your computer depends on the communication interface option you have chosen.  If you choose an interface other than USB, we strongly recommend that you also purchase a ZUSB Communication module, which will allow you to revoke from communication loss or error.  Please refer to the appropriate Quick Start Guide for your communication interface.  The guides may be found on our website here.

Your Taralist controller CANNOT be configured, and it will not be possible to proceed through these instructions without knowing the current COM port assignment.  Please refer to the Quick Start Guide for your Interface to determine this information.

Configuring Taralist with Base Station Software

Download and install the latest version of NCD Base Station software by following this link.

  1. Run the NCD Base Station software; you should see the following window appear.
  2. Select the appropriate Com Port for your device from the ‘Select Connection’ window and click ‘OK’.
  3. Click ‘Taralist Class Controller Configuration’ to begin configuring your device as shown below.

The NCD Base Station software is a powerful program used to load and save profiles into a Taralist controller.

Note: It is NOT possible to store Taralist configuration data into the Taralist Controller when the Program/Run jumper (PGM/RUN) is set to the Run position.  This jumper may be changed at any time.  Power cycling is NOT REQUIRED.

Program Mode allows you to permanently write to on-board nonvolatile storage.  Use this mode to load, test, and modify Taralist configuration data.

Run Mode write protects memory, making it impossible to store new configuration settings.

Note:  Some users may find the Taralist controller particularly suitable for a specific application.  Once you have created a Configuration file that matches your needs, you may email your Taralist configuration file to us, and we can build and ship any number of Taralist controllers with your configuration built in!  This will save you time and allow you to order a controller that is customized for your exact application at no additional cost.

When communications is established, the current information from the controller will be loaded.  Then you will see the following screen appear.  This screen has three tabs across the top the allow you to configure and control your Taralist device.

Now that communications are established between your computer and the Taralist controller, we are ready to move onto configuring the device.  To start, there are a few things to understand when it comes to Taralist Logic.  We will start with Events.

Understanding Events

Events are scheduled times when a relay or group of relays are turned on or off.  They are defined by the user by time: Year, Month, Day of Month, Day of week, Hour, Minute, and Second.  By having these options you have the ability of switching relays on or off at very specific times.  They are also defined by how they control the relays, whether they turn a relay or group of relays on or off.   You can add up to 999 Events to the list.

First we will talk about defining the time of an Event.  When determining time, the hour, minute, and second are required information.. These parameters must be entered.  If only these parameters are filled, then he event will occur every single day at this time.  However, you can fill in the Day of Week box so the event only occurs on a certain day of the week such as Monday.  You must check the box next Day of Week Much Match to Trigger Event for this parameter to take effect.  By filling in the rest of the parameters you can have an event only occur on December 25 2012 at 1:53.45 PM on that exact second.

Secondly we will talk about what the Event does, it controls relays. You can select exactly which relays in which banks (group of 8 relays) you want to come on or turn off when the event is triggered.

Adding/Removing Events

Events will be added under the ‘Time Event Builder’ on the left side of the ‘TARALIST Time Activated Relay Configuration’ tab.

  1. Add Event:  The first thing you will do is add an event.  One an Event is added to the list; it may then be edited with time and relay control information.
  2. Copy Event: This button will copy an existing event, this is useful if you need to create events with slight modifications from a previously configured event.
  3. Sort Events:  Sort Events will put all of the events entered into the list in order by time and date.  This is very important to know.  All 999 events are checked every second by the controller to look for a match with a current time.  If two events conflict with each other, the controller will not be able to process either event properly.  So if a relay does not come on when it is supposed to, click this ‘Sort Events’ button and look for events that conflict with each other.  It is important to know that items at the top of the list have lowest priority while items at the bottom of the list have the highest priority.  We recommend sorting your list periodically when entering events to the list.  The Taralist controller scans through all events in the list from top down to the bottom so events at the end of the list may override events at the top of the list.
  4. Delete Event: This button will remove a selected event from the list.
  5. DST Events:  Users have the option to automatically add all daylight savings time events to the event list.  When this button is pushed Daylight Saving time events are added to cover the next 30 years.  This will compensate the Taralist’s Clock each time Daylight Savings Time Comes Around.  However, this may be removed by simply clicking the DST Clear Button.
  6. Load:  You may load an Event List, saved as a file on your computer, into your controller easily by clicking this Loading button.  If you need to load a previously saved List of Events, this is the way to do it.
  7. Clear Events: This will remove all events from the list.
  8. DST Clear: This will remove all Daylight Savings Time events from the list.  If no DST events are in the list, this button will not do anything.
  9. Save:  Once you have spent the time to build a list of events we highly recommend you save that list of events as it cannot be loaded from the controller, there simply is not enough room in its memory chip.  By clicking this button you will be prompted to save a file on your computer.  At any time you can open this file and load it into the controller quickly and simply.

Defining Time

Now that we have determined what an event is and how to define an event, we can move on to how the Taralist controller keeps track of time.  By default the Taralist controller does not know what time it is so this must be defined.  The only way of doing this is from the NCD Base Station software.  Once your controller is connected to the computer and the program is launched, the first thing to do is tell the Taralist Controller what time it is.  You may do this manually or you can Sync the time with your PC.  The settings for this are located on the right side of the ‘TARALIST Time Activated Relay Configuration’ tab.  The user can do this by simply clicking the Sync Time with PC Time button or by filling in the Year, Month, Day, Week Day, Hour, Minute, Second parameters and then clicking the Set Time Manually button.

Time Compensation


Another feature that must be noted is that the Taralist controller’s time may drift by as much as a second each day.  How much the controller drifts is determined by Temperature, Power Supply, and specific application differences.  This has been accounted for in the design of the Taralist Controller and NCD Base Station software using the ‘Time Compensation’ feature found on the ‘TARALIST Time Activated Relay Configuration’ tab.  Once this Button is clicked, a new window will open.

Using this Feature, the user can add or subtract a specified amount of seconds in the Taralist Clock each day or only on a certain day to compensate for time drift in the Taralist Controller.

Midnight Backup Buffer


The Midnight Backup Buffer is absolutely essential to the functionality of the Taralist controller.  Without it power loss would result in a useless device.  Constant power supply is recommended for all Taralist controllers and a UPS style battery backup system is also recommended.  However, no matter how many precautions are taken, at some point a Taralist controller will lose power.  For example, if a relay is turned on a by an event on Monday and is told to turn back off on Friday but power is lost on Wednesday, without the Midnight Backup Buffer the relay will not turn back on until the following Monday.  So now you can see how essential this feature is.

Every night at Midnight; 0 hours, 0 minutes, 0 seconds, the controller reads what the status of all relays are at the exact second and stores that information into the Midnight Backup Buffer.  If a controller loses power momentarily and is powered back up, it will scan through all events from Midnight to the exact moment it is powered up.  It will also take into account the status of all relays at Midnight to determine what the status of all relays should be at the current time.

 

You can read the status of the Midnight Backup Buffer at any time by clocking the ‘Midnight Backup Buffer’ button found on the ‘TARALIST Time Activated Relay Configuration’ tab.  You may also modify the status of the Midnight Backup Buffer stored inside the Taralist controller.  This is helpful if you are working with brand new controller and it has nothing stored in the Midnight Backup Buffer.  If the relay was supposed to be turned on Monday and turned off Friday but you got your controller on Wednesday, you can modify the Midnight Backup Buffer to think the Relay was on at Midnight and if no events during the day tell it to turn off until Friday, the relay will come on until Friday.  Otherwise the Relay would not come on until Monday next week.

Protected Data

The ‘Global Device Configuration’ tab is used to reboot the controller or edit protected data.

Editing Protected Data

Protected Data is best described as a form of BIOS for a Taralist controller.  Under most circumstances, it is not necessary to Edit Protected Data, but there are circumstances that may require this operation.  Protected Data holds important parameters regarding the Taralist Relay controller you are using.  In some cases, you may want to change your hardware, so Editing Protected Data may be essential.

A Taralist Controller is allowed to interface to a computer while Runtime Mode.

The ‘Edit Protected Data’ feature is a universal resource for several different types of controllers that National Control Device offers.  For this reason there are options under Edit Protected Data that do not apply to Taralist controllers.

Device Interface

One option that could be changed under Edit Protected Data is the computer to device interface drop down menu shown above.  You will be able to choose from USB, 802.15.4, ZB Mesh, etc.

Charge Level

Another option that may be changed with your Taralist controller is the Charge Level.  This will control how fast the Taralist charges its onboard battery backup.  We recommend leaving the charge level as low as possible, 1 preferably, in order to extend the life of the battery.

Other options such as number of inputs, number of relays, CPU Speed, Type of Device, and IC number do not apply to your Taralist controller.

Computer Control of Taralist

Computer Override

The Taralist series controllers have some amazing abilities when it comes to making decisions on their own based on the events you configure into them, but you can take control of the relays at any time from a computer as long as communications are established between your computer and the Taralist device.

The Taralist Series Relay controllers support a “Lite” ProXR command set.  If you are familiar with our ProXR series relay controllers, then the command set should be easy to understand.  We will provide a summary of all Taralist commands in this manual, but for now, let’s explore some of the computer control features.

Interface Elements

The interface elements shown below allow a computer to take over control of any relay and force the relays to a On or Off state.  You may also turn all relays on or off using the ‘Turn On All Relays’ and ‘Turn Off All Relays’ buttons.

You can also read the status of relays by clicking the ‘Read Relays 1-8 Status’.  The Status of the relay will be shown to the right of the button.

The slider at the top of the screen allows you to select which bank of relays these commands are directed to.  You may attach up to 32 banks or 256 Relays.

Set Control of Relays

When you change the state of a relay manually from this screen, you have taken control of the particular relay and the Taralist controller will not be able to control it.  Using the ‘Set Control of Relays’ in the center section above, set the relay to be controlled by the Computer or the Taralist Device.  It is important to always return control of the relay back to the Taralist device after you are done manually controlling it.

Who Has Control of the Relays?

It is important to know if the Taralist device or your computer has control of the relays.  Use the ‘Who Has Control of Relays?’ section on the right to read who has control of each individual relay.  Simply click the ‘Who Controls Relay 1’ button and the information will be updated to the right of the button telling you who has control of Relay 1.  You may also read who has control of all 8 relays in a bank by clicking the ‘Who Controls All Relays’ button.

Custom Software Control

Custom software may be written to take computer control of the relays by using the ProXR Lite Command Set.  Custom Software may be written on any software platform capable of sending RS 232 bytes of data through a Com Port or through direct TCP/IP communications for Ethernet Devices.

Command Set

The following commands may be sent to the Reactor Series Relay Controllers to take control of relays and process other functions and inquiries.  Commands may be sent in Decimal values or Decimal Values may be converted to Hex depending on the preferred format of your programming language.

Please follow these steps to properly communicate to a Reactor:

  1. Clear Serial Receive Buffer (VERY IMPORTANT)
  2. Send Command
  3. Wait for a Response

Baud Rate is typically 115.2K Baud, 8 Data Bits, 1 Stop Bit, No Parity.

Baud Rate is 57.6K Baud for XSC Devices

Baud Rate can be set to 9600 Baud for RS-232 Version

IMPORTANT:  Taralist firmware has been re-written.  If your controller is identified as a ‘Taralist Enhanced’ Base Station Software, then your controller is capable of accepting commands at high communications speeds.  Older versions of the firmware will require a 1ms delay between communication bytes.  NCD STRONGLY ENCOURGES A FIRMWARE UPGRADE IF YOU ARE NOT USING TATLIST ENHANCED FIRMWARE.

Example to Activate Relay 1

  1. Clear Serial Receive Buffer
  2. Send Byte 254 (Hex 0xFE)
  3. Wait 1ms (Original Taralist firmware ONLY, Skip this Step if using Taralist Enhanced)
  4. Send Byte 108 (Hex 0x6C)
  5. Wait 1ms (Original Taralist firmware ONLY, Skip this Step if using Taralist Enhanced)
  6. Send Byte 1 (Hex 0x01)
  7. Wait for Response Byte 85 (Hex 0x55)

Send Bytes: Byte 1, Byte 2, Byte 3

Function: Header, Command, Parameter

Decimal Values: 254, 108, 1

Hex Values: 0xFE, 0x6C, 0x01

Receive Byte:

Decimal: 85

Hex: 0x55

Command Set Summary

The following commands may be sent to the Reactor Series Relay Controllers to take control of relays and process other functions and inquiries.  Commands may be sent in Decimal values (as shown) or may be converted to Hex depending on the preferred format of your programming language.  The Left column indicates the header byte; the second column indicates the command code.  A parameter (if required) is shown in third column.  A description indicates the function of the command, and finally return bytes are shown.

Header Byte Command Code Parameter Description Return Byte
254 33 Test 2-Way Communication 85
254 100 Bank Turn Off Relay 1 in Selected Bank 85
254 101 Bank Turn Off Relay 2 in Selected Bank 85
254 102 Bank Turn Off Relay 3 in Selected Bank 85
254 103 Bank Turn Off Relay 4 in Selected Bank 85
254 104 Bank Turn Off Relay 5 in Selected Bank 85
254 105 Bank Turn Off Relay 6 in Selected Bank 85
254 106 Bank Turn Off Relay 7 in Selected Bank 85
254 107 Bank Turn Off Relay 8 in Selected Bank 85
254 108 Bank Turn On Relay 1 in Selected Bank 85
254 109 Bank Turn On Relay 2 in Selected Bank 85
254 110 Bank Turn On Relay 3 in Selected Bank 85
254 111 Bank Turn On Relay 4 in Selected Bank 85
254 112 Bank Turn On Relay 5 in Selected Bank 85
254 113 Bank Turn On Relay 6 in Selected Bank 85
254 114 Bank Turn On Relay 7 in Selected Bank 85
254 115 Bank Turn On Relay 8 in Selected Bank 85
254 116 Bank Read Status of Relay 1 in Selected Bank 0-1
254 117 Bank Read Status of Relay 2 in Selected Bank 0-1
254 118 Bank Read Status of Relay 3 in Selected Bank 0-1
254 119 Bank Read Status of Relay 4 in Selected Bank 0-1
254 120 Bank Read Status of Relay 5 in Selected Bank 0-1
254 121 Bank Read Status of Relay 6 in Selected Bank 0-1
254 122 Bank Read Status of Relay 7 in Selected Bank 0-1
254 123 Bank Read Status of Relay 8 in Selected Bank 0-1
254 124 Bank Report Status of Selected Relay Bank 0-255
254 129 Bank Turn Off all Relays in Selected Bank 85
254 130 Bank Turn On all Relays in Selected Bank 85
254 140 Bank Set the Status of All Relays in Selected Bank 85
254 246 Get Device ID Data 4-Bytes
64 246 Reboot Controller No Return
64 100 Bank Set Control of Relay 1 to Device 85
64 101 Bank Set Control of Relay 2 to Device 85
64 102 Bank Set Control of Relay 3 to Device 85
64 103 Bank Set Control of Relay 4 to Device 85
64 104 Bank Set Control of Relay 5 to Device 85
64 105 Bank Set Control of Relay 6 to Device 85
64 106 Bank Set Control of Relay 7 to Device 85
64 107 Bank Set Control of Relay 8 to Device 85
64 108 Bank Set Control of Relay 1 to Computer 85
64 109 Bank Set Control of Relay 2 to Computer 85
64 110 Bank Set Control of Relay 3 to Computer 85
64 111 Bank Set Control of Relay 4 to Computer 85
64 112 Bank Set Control of Relay 5 to Computer 85
64 113 Bank Set Control of Relay 6 to Computer 85
64 114 Bank Set Control of Relay 7 to Computer 85
64 115 Bank Set Control of Relay 8 to Computer 85
64 116 Bank Read Control Status of Relay 1 in Selected Bank 0-1
64 117 Bank Read Control Status of Relay 2 in Selected Bank 0-1
64 118 Bank Read Control Status of Relay 3 in Selected Bank 0-1
64 119 Bank Read Control Status of Relay 4 in Selected Bank 0-1
64 120 Bank Read Control Status of Relay 5 in Selected Bank 0-1
64 121 Bank Read Control Status of Relay 6 in Selected Bank 0-1
64 122 Bank Read Control Status of Relay 7 in Selected Bank 0-1
64 123 Bank Read Control Status of Relay 8 in Selected Bank 0-1
64 124 Bank Report Control Status of Selected Relay Bank 0-255
64 129 Bank Set all Relays Under Device Control Relays in Selected Bank 85
64 130 Bank Set all Relays Under Computer Control Relays in Selected Bank 85

 

Header Byte Command Code Parameter Description Return Byte
64 140 Status Bank Set the Control Status of All Relays in Selected Bank 85
65 246 Halt Event Processing 85
65 247 Resume Event Processing 85
65 99 Get Current Time from Controller 7 Bytes + Checksum
65 100 7 time Bytes Plus Checksum Set Current Time from Controller 85 Successful
86 Error
0 1 Load Data from CPU EEPROM for Use by Configuration Utility Only
0 2 Save Data to CPU EEPROM for Use by Configuration Utility ONLY
0 3 Load Data from External EEPROM Chip for Use by Configuration Utility ONLY
0 4 Save Data to External EEPROM Chip for Use by Configuration Utility Only

 

Absolute Maximum Ratings Minimum Rated MAX
Input Voltage Requirements VDC 11 12 14.5
Amperage Requirements
Standby (No Relays On, No Communications Module 31ma
ZUSB USB Communications Module Installed 33ma
1mw Communications Module Installed 32ma*
100mw Communications Module Installed 32ma*
Each 5A/10A Relay Activated Adds to Consumption 32ma
Each 20A/30A Relay Activated Adds to Consumption 45ma
Each Solid State Relay Activated Adds to Consumption 5ma
Temperature Ratings (Estimated)** -25°C 80°C
Mechanical Relay Cycle Life (Non-DPDT Versions): >10,000,000 Cycles
Mechanical Relay Cycle Life (DPDT Versions): >2,000,000 Cycles
Typical Operational Cycles per Minute: 1,800
Relay Activation Time: >5ms <15ms
Relay Deactivation Time: >5ms <20ms
Command Processing Time: 1ms 3ms 5ms
Relay Electrical Limits should be Determined by Reviewing Appropriate Relay Data Sheet:
5A Relays Data Sheet
10A Relays Data Sheet
20A Relays Data Sheet
30A Relays Data Sheet
Solid State Relays Sheet
* Communications will Increase Current Consumption by up to 250ms for short times.
** Ratings Based on Data Sheets of Component Used, Actual Tolerance May Exceed Ratings.

Troubleshooting

Base Station Software can be used to Test the hardware features of Taralist controllers.

  • Run Base Station software
  • Choose the appropriate Com Port and click ‘OK’.
  • Click on ‘Taralist Relay Quality Control and Diagnostics’ to start testing your device.

Test your controller with the items on the Taralist Relay Quality Control and Diagnostics window:

Problem: Relay does not come on at appropriate time.

Solution:  Make sure there are no conflicting events in the configuration.  Click the sort Events button as documented earlier in this guide.  It is important to know that events at the top of the list have lowest priority.  The reason for this is the Taralist controller scans through all events in the list from the top to the bottom before it refreshes the relays, so events at the bottom of the list can override events at the top of the list.

An Inductive device can also cause communication malfunctions in the CPU, review our Documentation on Inductive Devices to correct this problem.

Problem: Clock Speed running slow or fast.

Solution:  The Taralist controller may be affected by temperature.  In excessively cold environments the clock may run slow, in excessively hot conditions the clock may run fast.  This can be corrected using the Time Compensation feature.  The Taralist controllers clock may naturally drift even at room temperature by as much as 1 second per day.  This can be corrected using the Time Compensation feature.

Problem: Controller is Running HOT.

Solution:  It is normal for some components run very hot on the Taralist series relay controllers.  This is not a concern as we have tested the design carefully and are operating our components well within the specified limits of the components we are using.  It is NOT normal for the CPU to run hot at any time.  The CPU should remain cool.  If the CPU is running hot and/or both Busy/Ready LEDS are on at the same time, the CPU has been damaged.

Problem: Unable to Communicate with Controller

Solution:  Use the ZUSB Communication Module to validate communications; do NOT use any other communications module if this error occurs.  The ZUSB is the safest communication method of all communication technologies, and must be used if you experience configuration problems.  Make sure you are using the correct COM port.  Our software has been tested under Windows 7, 8, and 10.  If the problem persists, makes sure the serial port is NOT in use by another application.  Lastly, we can only recommend trying a different computer if problems if you cannot establish communications.

2 Comments

Comments are closed.

  1. Vic Steele 2 years ago

    I purchased five (5) Taralist Time control Modules several years ago to operate in Separate Buildings at a Plant Location that I service in order to have a simple way for Alarms to be set for shift changes, breaks, lunch breaks, etc.. I am now needing to have the ability to Control all of the existing units plus adding another one, wirelessly from the Plants Computer Server location. All of the Timers are in different buildings on the property with the farthest building being approximately 1/4 mile away. What transmitters and/or receivers do I need to add to the Taralist timers and Computer to get this done?

    • Author
      Ryan 2 years ago

      Hi Vic,
      Thanks for contacting us. It might be good to post this question on our forum at forum.ncd.io as comments about our articles are monitored by a separate department. Our engineers can help you plan the devices you need for your application.
      Thanks!
      Ryan
      ncd.io

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