ProXR Quick Start Guide

ProXR is a standard set of relay control commands that allow users to control relays by sending bytes of data.  Turn relays on or off, trigger timers, flashers, and control relay groups using the ProXR command set.  This document will guide you through everything you need to know to start using NCD ProXR series controllers.

Introduction

Using Base Station with ProXR USB Relay Controllers

This tutorial will help you learn to use our Base Station graphical user interface to control ProXR USB Relay Controllers.  Base Station is the software we use to demonstrate the features of our devices.  Base Station works by identifying the controller.  This software will generate a list of compatible control panels and demonstrate each individual feature.  This tutorial will display the bytes of data required to control our entire line of USB Relay Controllers.  This makes integration into your own software effortless, regardless of language or platform.  NCD USB Relay Controllers will act as a virtual com port on your PC.  Simply open the port and send your data to begin controlling relays.  Download Base Station Software from //ncd.io/start. Base Station software is compatible with Windows 8 and Windows 10.  The latest Dot NET framework must be installed when working with older operating systems.

USB Relay Controllers: A Complete Tutorial

This tutorial covers all ProXR series controllers.  We will be using USB ProXR and ProXR Lite Series controllers for this tutorial.   Base Station software supports other interface technologies.  USB Controllers mount as a Virtual COM port on your computer.  Most Windows PCs include the drivers necessary to talk to our controllers; however, a comprehensive list of supported drivers and operating systems are available at http://www.ftdichip.com/FTDrivers.htm

Once the controller is plugged into the USB port of your computer, the USB LED should light on the USB interface module plugged into the controller.  If this light does not illuminate, your computer has not properly enumerated the USB driver (please see the link above install the latest drivers).

Communications to any NCD controller is as easy as sending bytes out the serial port.  The default baud rate for all USB devices we manufacture is 115.2K Baud, 8 Data Bits, 1 Stop Bit, No Parity. NCD controllers expect to receive raw bytes of data for best possible speed. For this reason, common terminal programs should only be used in a way that supports raw data bytes rather than ASCII. The tables in this guide are shown in Hexadecimal values by default with an option to display commands in decimal values using a button above each table labeled “Show as Decimal”. All NCD ProXR class controllers are speak when spoken to. Send a command and receive a response. The Hex values shown should be sent out the communications port (TX Portion of the table) and the controller will respond (RX Portion of the table).

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Relay Control

Relay Control Commands

This section will demonstrate basic relay control commands, reading the status of relays, controlling all relays at once, including reversing and inverting relay status.  The video above demonstrates ProXR commands on a 4-Channel USB relay board.  This particular controllers is a ProXR Lite series, which includes 8 analog to digital inputs and USB interface module that may be replaced by a WiFi, Bluetooth, RS-232, Dropnet, Ethernet, Ethernet web page, or industrial wireless (Digi 802.15.4 or 900HP series) communications module.

Here, you will see the word “Bank”.  A bank is simply a group of 8 relays.  Bank 1 refers to the first group of 8 relays.  Bank 2 refers to the second group of 8 relays (for larger controllers).  ProXR controllers have firmware support for 32 Banks of relays, though it may not be possible to install 32 banks of relays for all installations.  Sometimes it is useful to send commands to a bank, so a Bank value is often included as part of the command.  Using a Bank value of 0 will apply a command to all banks of relays.

The tables below show sample commands found in this tutorial.

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Turning Relays Off in All Relay Banks

Commands Below are in Hex Format using API Mode. TX = Bytes Sent to the Controller RX = Bytes Received from the Controller.  Note Bytes Received May be Different for Some Commands.

R = Relay Control Command
B = Banks (0 = All Banks)
CK = Checksum
TX:23RBCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA03FE64000FTurn Off Relay 1 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE650010Turn Off Relay 2 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE660011Turn Off Relay 3 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE670012Turn Off Relay 4 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE680013Turn Off Relay 5 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE690014Turn Off Relay 6 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE6A0015Turn Off Relay 7 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE6B0016Turn Off Relay 8 in All Relay BanksAA015500

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Turning Relays On in All Relay Banks

Commands Below are in Hex Format using API Mode. TX = Bytes Sent to the Controller RX = Bytes Received from the Controller.  Note Bytes Received May be Different for Some Commands.

R = Relay
B = Bank (0 = All Banks)
CK = Checksum
TX:23RBCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA03FE6C0017Turn On Relay 1 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE6D0018Turn On Relay 2 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE6E0019Turn On Relay 3 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE6F001ATurn On Relay 4 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE70001BTurn On Relay 5 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE71001CTurn On Relay 6 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE72001DTurn On Relay 7 in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE73001ETurn On Relay 8 in All Relay BanksAA015500

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Turning Individual Relays Off in Selected Relay Banks

Commands Below are in Hex Format using API Mode. TX = Bytes Sent to the Controller RX = Bytes Received from the Controller.  Note Bytes Received May be Different for Some Commands.

R = Relay
B = Bank
CK = Checksum
TX:23RBCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA03FE640110Turn Off Relay 1 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE650111Turn Off Relay 2 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE660112Turn Off Relay 3 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE670113Turn Off Relay 4 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE680114Turn Off Relay 5 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE690115Turn Off Relay 6 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE6A0116Turn Off Relay 7 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE6B0117Turn Off Relay 8 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE640211Turn Off Relay 1 in Bank 2AA015500
AA03FE640312Turn Off Relay 1 in Bank 3AA015500
AA03FE640413Turn Off Relay 1 in Bank 4AA015500

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Turning Individual Relays On in Selected Relay Banks

Commands Below are in Hex Format using API Mode. TX = Bytes Sent to the Controller RX = Bytes Received from the Controller.  Note Bytes Received May be Different for Some Commands.

R = Relay
B = Bank
CK = Checksum
TX:23RBCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA03FE6C0118Turn On Relay 1 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE6D0119Turn On Relay 2 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE6E011ATurn On Relay 3 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE6F011BTurn On Relay 4 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE70011CTurn On Relay 5 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE71011DTurn On Relay 6 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE72011ETurn On Relay 7 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE73011FTurn On Relay 8 in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE6C0219Turn On Relay 1 in Bank 2AA015500
AA03FE6C031ATurn On Relay 1 in Bank 3AA015500
AA03FE6C041BTurn On Relay 1 in Bank 4AA015500

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Set the Status of All Relays in Selected Bank

Commands Below are in Hex Format using API Mode. TX = Bytes Sent to the Controller RX = Bytes Received from the Controller.  Note Bytes Received May be Different for Some Commands.

C = Command
B = Bank
CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:23CBCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA03FE81002CTurn All Relays Off in All BanksAA015500
AA03FE81012DTurn All Relays Off in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE81022ETurn All Relays Off in Bank 2AA015500
AA03FE81032FTurn All Relays Off in Bank 3AA015500
AA03FE810430Turn All Relays Off in Bank 4AA015500
AA03FE82002DTurn All Relays On in All BanksAA015500
AA03FE82012ETurn All Relays On in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE82022FTurn All Relays On in Bank 2AA015500
AA03FE820330Turn All Relays On in Bank 3AA015500
AA03FE820431Turn All Relays On in Bank 4AA015500
AA03FE83002EInvert the Status of All Relays in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE83012FInvert the Status of All Relays in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE830230Invert the Status of All Relays in Bank 2AA015500
AA03FE830331Invert the Status of All Relays in Bank 3AA015500
AA03FE830432Invert the Status of All Relays in Bank 4AA015500
AA03FE84002FReverse the Pattern of All Relays in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA03FE840130Reverse the Pattern of All Relays in Bank 1AA015500
AA03FE840231Reverse the Pattern of All Relays in Bank 2AA015500
AA03FE840332Reverse the Pattern of All Relays in Bank 3AA015500
AA03FE840433Reverse the Pattern of All Relays in Bank 4AA015500

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Set the Status of All Relays in Selected Bank

The following table shows a single command used with different parameters.  The purpose of this command is to set the status of 8 relays simultaneously.  The 5th byte of this command indicates the binary pattern for relay control.  The 6th byte of this command applies this value to a single bank (Bank Value of 1-32) or all banks simultaneously (Bank Value of 0). Commands Below are in Hex Format using API Mode. TX = Bytes Sent to the Controller RX = Bytes Received from the Controller.  Note Bytes Received May be Different for Some Commands.

P = Pattern in Binary (00-FF)
B = Bank (00-20) (00 = All Banks)
CK = Checksum
TX:234PBCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA04FE8C000038Turn Off All Relays in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA04FE8C55008DTurn On All ODD Relays in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA04FE8CAA00E2Turn On All EVEN Relays in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA04FE8CFF0037Turn On All Relays in All Relay BanksAA015500
AA04FE8C000139Turn Off All Relays in Bank 1AA015500
AA04FE8C55018ETurn On All ODD Relays in Bank 1AA015500
AA04FE8CAA01E3Turn On All EVEN Relays in Bank 1AA015500
AA04FE8CFF0138Turn On All Relays in Bank 1AA015500

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Controlling Individual Relays

Controlling individual relays refers to controlling relays by their designated numeric assignment rather than using the relay bank system we normally use.  These commands were included as an alternative method of controlling relays to help suit the preferences of a particular user.  Referring to relays by their numeric value may be easier for some users to comprehend, as relay 1 is the first relay on the board and relay 32 is the last relay on the board when working with a 32-channel relay controller.  This section also includes relay selector command, which can be used to select the activation of one particular relay, ensuring all other relays remain off.

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Controlling Individual Relay Commands

The following commands make use of a RelayNumber parameter, which are always 16-bit values.  The RelayNumber is a the number of the relay you would like to control.  This RelayNumber variable is converted into LSB and MSB values, which is subsequently communicated to the controller.

RelayNumber = The Relay Number you would like to control.

LSB = ((RelayNumber) And 255)
MSB = (((RelayNumber) And 65280) / 255)

Since most users will be working with less than 256 relays, the following substitutions can be made to help simplify this process:

LSB = Relay Number (0 to 255)
MSB = 0

Should you need to speak to more than 256 relays, changing the MSB to 1 will only speak to relays above 256.  The following values will only talk to relays 256 to 511:

LSB = Relay Number (0 to 255)
MSB = 1 (This will send the LSB above to relays 256 through 512)

Commands Below are in Hex Format using API Mode. TX = Bytes Sent to the Controller RX = Bytes Received from the Controller.  Note Bytes Received May be Different for Some Commands.

TX:234LSBMSBCKSFunctionRX:234
AA04FE2C0000D8Read the Status of Relay 1AA0100AB
AA04FE2CFF00D7Read the Status of Relay 256AA0100AB
AA04FE2C0001D9Read the Status of Relay 257AA0100AB
AA04FE2E0000DATurn Off All Relays then Activate Relay 1AA015500
AA04FE2EFF00D9Turn Off All Relays then Activate Relay 256AA015500
AA04FE2E0001DBTurn Off All Relays then Activate Relay 257AA015500
AA04FE2F0000DBTurn Off Relay 1AA015500
AA04FE2FFF00DATurn Off Relay 256AA015500
AA04FE2F0001DCTurn Off Relay 257AA015500
AA04FE300000DCTurn On Relay 1AA015500
AA04FE30FF00DBTurn On Relay 256AA015500
AA04FE300001DDTurn On Relay 257AA015500

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Relay Toggle Commands

Toggle commands are used to toggle the state of a relay.  If a relay is off, the relay will activate when the toggle command is sent.  Similarly, if the toggle command is sent again, the relay turn off.

Toggle commands will require ProXR V3.9 firmware or later.
R = Relay
CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234R67CKFunction:RX:23CK
AA05FE2F000001DDToggle Relay 1AA015500
AA05FE2F010001DEToggle Relay 2AA015500
AA05FE2F020001DFToggle Relay 3AA015500
AA05FE2F030001E0Toggle Relay 4AA015500
AA05FE2F040001E1Toggle Relay 5AA015500
AA05FE2F050001E2Toggle Relay 6AA015500
AA05FE2F060001E3Toggle Relay 7AA015500
AA05FE2F070001E4Toggle Relay 8AA015500

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Relay Grouping

Simulating Larger Relays with Smaller Relays

Relay grouping commands can help you save money, and in some cases, a lot of money.  Simulating large expensive relays with smaller low-cost relays is an excellent way to provide greater functionality at a much lower cost point.  Relay grouping is the process of controlling relays in groups rather than individual relays.  For instance, we do not offer 20-Amp DPDT relay.  Locating such a relay may be impossible or expensive, so instead, you can simulate a 20-Amp DPDT relay using two 20-Amp SPDT relays for a much more reasonable and accessible price.  Another common request we receive is a 10-Amp DPDT relay controller.  DPDT relays with a 10 Amp rating are more accessible, but still very costly.  Again, we can use a relay grouping command to simulate a 10-Amp DPDT relay using two 10-Amp SPDT relays.  You can really start saving money if you have needs for exotic relay configurations, such as 3PDT, 4PDT, or even 8PDT (if there is such a thing).

Relay grouping introduces a “Neighbor” variable to standard ProXR relay control commands.  The Neighbor parameter is used to define how many Neighboring relays you would like to apply to a relay control command.  Here’s an example:

Standard Command for Activating Relay 1:
Hex: AA 03 FE 6C 18
Decimal: 170 3 254 108 1 24
Standard Command for Activating Relay 1 + 1 Neighbor (2 SPDT Relays to Simulate a DPDT Relay):
Hex: AA 04 FE 6C 01 01 1A
Decimal: 170 4 254 108 1 1 26

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Relay Grouping Commands

The following relay grouping commands can be used to activate relays in groups, simulating DPDT, 3PDT, 4DPDT, and up to 8PDT relays using low-cost SPDT relays.  Note the Neighbor Parameter (N) has a maximum allowed value of 7.  Also note the (N) value cannot extend into the next bank.  For instance, Relay 1 has up to 7 neighbors, but Relay 8 has no neighbors because Relay number 9 is located in the next relay bank (Bank 2).  Here is a table of Neighbors allowed for each relay:

RelayMaximum Neighbors
17
26
35
44
53
62
71
80

Here are a few examples that properly apply neighbors:

R= Relay
N = Neighbors
CK = Checksum (00-FF)

TX:23R5NCKDPDT SIMULATION FUNCTION WITH 1 NEIGHBOR:RX:23CK
AA04FE6C01011AActivate Relay 1 and 2 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE6E01011CActivate Relay 3 and 4 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE7001011EActivate Relay 5 and 6 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE72010120Activate Relay 7 and 8 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE64010112Deactivate Relay 1 and 2 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE66010114Deactivate Relay 3 and 4 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE68010116Deactivate Relay 5 and 6 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE6A010118Deactivate Relay 7 and 8 SimultaneouslyAA015500
TX:23R5NCK3PDT SIMULATION FUNCTION WITH 2 NEIGHBORS:RX:23CK
AA04FE6C01021BActivate Relay 1,2,3 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE6F01021EActivate Relay 4,5,6 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE64010213Deactivate Relay 1,2,3 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE67010216Deactivate Relay 4,5,6 SimultaneouslyAA015500
TX:23R5NCK4PDT SIMULATION FUNCTION WITH 3 NEIGHBORS:RX:23CK
AA04FE6C01031CActivate Relay 1,2,3,4 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE70010320Activate Relay 5,6,7,8 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE64010314Deactivate Relay 1,2,3,4 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE68010318Deactivate Relay 5,6,7,8 SimultaneouslyAA015500
TX:23R5NCK8PDT SIMULATION FUNCTION WITH 7 NEIGHBORS:RX:23CK
AA04FE6C010720Activate Relay 1-8 SimultaneouslyAA015500
AA04FE64010718Deactivate Relay 1-8 SimultaneouslyAA015500

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Relay Flashers

Relay Flashers: Flashing a Relay

Flashing a Relays is the process of turning a relay on and off in the background while the controller processes other tasks.  Users are free to handle other relay control operations while relays are flashing.  Relay flashers make it easy to handle turn signal, road sign, and warning light applications with minimal integration time.  There are 16 Relay Flashers, allowing 16 relays to flash simultaneously.  Relay Flashers allow you to set the flash speed (S), which is applied to all Flashers (it is not possible to have each relay operating at a different flash rate).

Individual Flashers (F) may be turned On or Off (O) using the commands shown below.

F = Flasher (0 = All Flashers)
S = Speed of Flash (00-FF)
CK = Checksum (00-FF)

TX:234FSCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA04FE2D0000D9Sets All Flashers to Fastest SpeedAA015500
AA04FE2D00320BSets All Flashers to Slow SpeedAA015500
AA04FE2D008059Sets All Flashers to Very Slow SpeedAA015500
AA04FE2D00FFD8Sets All Flashers to Slowest SpeedAA015500

F = Flasher (0 = All Flashers)
O = 0 = Off / 1 = On
CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234FOCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA04FE2D0100DATurn Off Flasher 1AA015500
AA04FE2D0101DBTurn On Flasher 1AA015500
AA04FE2D0200DBTurn Off Flasher 2AA015500
AA04FE2D0201DCTurn On Flasher 2AA015500
AA04FE2D0300DCTurn Off Flasher 3AA015500
AA04FE2D0301DDTurn On Flasher 3AA015500
AA04FE2D0400DDTurn Off Flasher 4AA015500
AA04FE2D0401DETurn On Flasher 4AA015500
AA04FE2D0500DETurn Off Flasher 5AA015500
AA04FE2D0501DFTurn On Flasher 5AA015500
AA04FE2D0600DFTurn Off Flasher 6AA015500
AA04FE2D0601E0Turn On Flasher 6AA015500
AA04FE2D0700E0Turn Off Flasher 7AA015500
AA04FE2D0701E1Turn On Flasher 7AA015500
AA04FE2D0800E1Turn Off Flasher 8AA015500
AA04FE2D0801E2Turn On Flasher 8AA015500
AA04FE2D0900E2Turn Off Flasher 9AA015500
AA04FE2D0901E3Turn On Flasher 9AA015500
AA04FE2D0A00E3Turn Off Flasher 10AA015500
AA04FE2D0A01E4Turn On Flasher 10AA015500
AA04FE2D0B00E4Turn Off Flasher 11AA015500
AA04FE2D0B01E5Turn On Flasher 11AA015500
AA04FE2D0C00E5Turn Off Flasher 12AA015500
AA04FE2D0C01E6Turn On Flasher 12AA015500
AA04FE2D0D00E6Turn On Flasher 13AA015500
AA04FE2D0D01E7Turn Of Flasher 13AA015500
AA04FE2D0E00E7Turn On Flasher 14AA015500
AA04FE2D0E01E8Turn Off Flasher 14AA015500
AA04FE2D0F00E8Turn On Flasher 15AA015500
AA04FE2D0F01E9Turn Off Flasher 15AA015500
AA04FE2D1000E9Turn On Flasher 16AA015500
AA04FE2D1001EATurn Off Flasher 16AA015500

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Relay Flashers with Timers

Relay Timers and Flashers are directly connected, meaning Relay Timer 1 is directly connected to Flasher 1.  Similarly, Timer 2 is connected to Flasher 2.  This makes it possible to flash a relay for a period of time using a pair of commands.  The following commands demonstrate Flash Timer features working together.

Start by turning on Flasher 1:

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:23456CKFunction:RX:23CK
AA04FE2D0101DBStep 1: Turn On Flasher 1AA015500

Next, Activate Timer 1:

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:2345678CKFunction:RX:23CK
AA06FE323200000A1CActivate Timer 1AA015500

When the timer expires, the relay flasher will be canceled.  Note that all 16 timers are connected to all 16 flashers in this same way.

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Relay Refreshing

Relay Refreshing: Automatic and Manual Modes

This video demonstrates a 16-Channel relay board with a USB interface module installed.  By default, ProXR controllers automatically refresh relays.  When automatic relay refreshing is turned off, the relays will not change state when relay control commands are sent.  Instead, only the relay memory will change.  A separate relay refreshing command must be sent to make the controller update the status of the physical relays.  This allows users to send many relay control commands to the controller in any order, then refresh all relays simultaneously.

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Relay Refreshing Commands

CK = Checksum
TX:234CKFunction:RX:23CK
AA02FE19C3Turn On Automatic Relay RefreshingAA015500
AA02FE1AC4Turn Off Automatic Relay RefreshingAA015500
AA02FE25CFManually Refresh All Relay BanksAA015500
AA02FE24CERead the Automatic Relay Refreshing StatusAA0100AB

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Reading Relay Status

Reading the Status of Relays

Commands Below are in Hex Format using API Mode. TX = Bytes Sent to the Controller RX = Bytes Received from the Controller.  Note: Bytes Received May be Different for Some Commands.

R = Relay (74-7C)
B = Bank (01-20)
ST = Status of Relays Byte (00-FF)
CK = Checksum Byte (00-FF)
TX:23RBCKFunction:RX:2STCK
AA03FE740120Read the On/Off Status of Relay 1 in Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE750121Read the On/Off Status of Relay 2 in Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE760122Read the On/Off Status of Relay 3 in Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE770123Read the On/Off Status of Relay 4 in Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE780124Read the On/Off Status of Relay 5 in Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE790125Read the On/Off Status of Relay 6 in Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE7A0126Read the On/Off Status of Relay 7 in Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE7B0127Read the On/Off Status of Relay 8 in Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE7C0128Read the On/Off Status of All Relays in Bank 1AA0100AB

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ProXR Scratchpad Memory

Scratchpad Memory

Scratchpad Memory is used to store 8 user defined bytes of data.  Scratchpad Memory can be used for anything, such as a location, serial number, or other type of identifier.  The values stored do not affect the operation of the controller, as this memory is specifically for user-defined purposes.  Please note, the controller MUST be set to Configuration mode to write to Scratchpad Memory.  The following commands will demonstrate reading and writing data from scratchpad memory.  Memory Location (L) and the return Value (V) are identified in the table below:

L = Memory Location (01-08)
V = Value (00-FF)
CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234LCKFunction:RX:2VCK
AA03FE3301DFRead Location 1AA0101AC
AA03FE3302E0Read Location 2AA0102AD
AA03FE3303E1Read Location 3AA0103AE
AA03FE3304E2Read Location 4AA0104AF
AA03FE3305E3Read Location 5AA0105B0
AA03FE3306E4Read Location 6AA0106B1
AA03FE3307E5Read Location 7AA0107B2
AA03FE3308E6Read Location 8AA0108B3

The following commands demonstrate how to write data to Scratchpad Memory.  Memory Location (L) has a possible value of 1 through 8 while Data (V) has a possible value of 0 to 255 (8-Bit).

L = Memory Location (01-08)
V = Value (00-FF)
CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234LVCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA04FE340101E1Write Location 1AA015500
AA04FE340202E2Write Location 2AA015500
AA04FE340303E3Write Location 3AA015500
AA04FE340404E4Write Location 4AA015500
AA04FE340505E5Write Location 5AA015500
AA04FE340606E6Write Location 6AA015500
AA04FE340707E7Write Location 7AA015500
AA04FE340808E8Write Location 8AA015500

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Relay Timers

Relay Timers

Relay Timers are used to automatically control relays for applications that might require failsafe control.  For instance, controlling a relay using a standard relay control command may prove dangerous.  Instead, timers can be used to explicitly specify the duration of time a relay should be activated.  Using relay timer commands, users may tell a relay to turn on for 5 minutes.  Should the computer fail to communicate with the controller after 5 minutes, the relay will automatically shut off.  To extend this analogy, users may repeatedly tell a relay to turn on for 30 seconds.  The relay will stay on as long as the timer command is sent within 30 seconds.  If the computer stops sending the timer command, the relay will turn off after 30 seconds, acting as a failsafe switch to control loads that may be time sensitive.

ProXR controllers include 16 timers, each of which can have their own duration of time in Hours (HR) Minutes (MN) Seconds (SC).  Each Timer can control any Relay (R) using numeric ordering (the first relay is relay 0).  Two types of timers are supported, Duration and Pulse.  A Duration timer is a timer that activates a relay for a duration of time, then turns the relay off once the time has expired.  A pulse timer is a timer that pulses a relay only after the elapsed time has expired.  Pulse timers are useful for automatic gate control or garage door opening applications.  Duration timers are controlled using a (T) value of 50-65 as indicated in the table below.  Pulse timers are activated using a (T) value of 70-85.

Timers are simulated in firmware, and may not be suitable for applications that require precision accuracy.  Similarly, each timer shares the same time base, introducing a margin of error of 1 second when activating timers at random.  Perhaps the biggest technical question we receive regarding timers is a simple misunderstanding between the (T) and (R) columns in the table below.  All controllers are equipped with 16 timers, but different controllers are equipped with different numbers of physical relays.  A timer and a relay are not equal, but it may be helpful to use equal values as you learn.  For instance, always control the first relay with timer 0, the second relay with timer 1, etc.

For some users, a 32 channel relay controller may seem limited with only 16 timers.  However, any of the 16 timers may be applied to any of the 32 relays.  So as long as a timer is available (not active), it can be applied to any relay.  If your application requires more than 16 timers to run simultaneously, then a second controller would be required.

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Relay Timers (Set and Activate)

The following commands will set and activate a timer.

Relay Timers offer even deeper functionality, as they may also be paused or resumed at any time.  Similarly, relay timers may be set, but not activated until a later time.  Reading the status and remaining time of timers is also possible using the timer command set.

T = Timer
HR = Hours
MN = Minutes
SC = Seconds
R = Relay
CK = Checksum
TX:234THRMNSCRCKFunctionRX23CK
AA07FE32320000050018Relay 0 On for Duration of 5 Seconds using Timer 0AA015500
AA07FE3246000005002CPulse Relay 0 using Timer 0 after 5 SecondsAA015500
AA07FE323300000A001ERelay 0 On for Duration of 10 Seconds using Timer 1AA015500
AA07FE324700000A0032Pulse Relay 0 using Timer 1 after 10 SecondsAA015500
AA07FE32410100001F42Relay 31 On for Duration of 1 Hour using Timer 15AA015500
AA07FE3255010000174EPulse Relay 23 using Timer 15 after 1 HourAA015500
AA07FE323D000A00153DRelay 21 On for Duration of 10 Min. using Timer 11AA015500
AA07FE3254001400165FPulse Relay 22 using Timer 14 after 20 MinutesAA015500

The following example commands demonstrate various timer features:

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Relay Timers (Set Only)

The following relay timer commands will configure the timer values only, but will NOT activate the timers.  Timer activation is handled by the “Relay Timers: Pause and Resume” section of this guide.

T = Timer
HR = Hours
MN = Minutes
SC = Seconds
R = Relay
CK = Checksum
TX:234THRMNSCRCKFunctionRX234
AA07FE325A0000050040Relay 0 On for Duration of 5 Seconds using Timer 0AA015500
AA07FE326E0000050054Pulse Relay 0 using Timer 0 after 5 SecondsAA015500
AA07FE323300000A001ERelay 0 On for Duration of 10 Seconds using Timer 1AA015500
AA07FE326E00000A0059Pulse Relay 0 using Timer 1 after 10 SecondsAA015500
AA07FE32690100001F6ARelay 31 On for Duration of 1 Hour using Timer 15AA015500
AA07FE327D0100001776Pulse Relay 23 using Timer 15 after 1 HourAA015500
AA07FE3265000A001565Relay 21 On for Duration of 10 Min. using Timer 11AA015500
AA07FE327C0014001687Pulse Relay 22 using Timer 14 after 20 MinutesAA015500

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Relay Timers: Pause and Resume

The commands below set the active status of all 16 timers.  Timers are either active or inactive, in other words, they are running (counting down), or they are paused (not counting down).  LSB and MSB are 16-bit binary values used to define the active state of each of the 16 timers.  When a specific timer is set active, all other timers are set as inactive.  When working with the above commands, make sure you always take into account that any bits not set will deactivate the associated timer, and may inadvertently deactivate any timers that may be running.  It’s also important to note the above commands will not cancel a timer, they will simply pause a timer.

LSB = Least Significant Byte
MSB = Most Significant Byte
T = Timer
HR = Hours
MN = Minutes
SC = Seconds
R = Relay
CK = Checksum
TX:234TLSBMSBCKFunctionRX:23CK
AA05FE3283FEFE60Activate All TimersAA015500
AA05FE3283000062Deactivate All TimersAA015500
AA05FE3283010063Activate Timer 1 Deactivate All OthersAA015500
AA05FE32838000E2Activate Timer 8 Deactivate All OthersAA015500
AA05FE3283000163Activate Timer 9 Deactivate All OthersAA015500
AA05FE32830080E2Activate Timer 16 Deactivate All OthersAA015500

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Relay Timer Query

The commands below demonstrate how to query a timer.  Using query commands, users may ask the controller the amount of time remaining for each timer.  Timers always count down in one second intervals, so each second, the received value will change for all active timers.  A timer query command will return 4 parameters: Remaining Hours (H), Minutes (M), Seconds (S), and the Relay (R) associated with the timer.

T = Timer
HR = Hours
MN = Minutes
SC = Seconds
R = Relay
CK = Checksum
TX:2345TCKFunctionRX:2HRMNSCRCK
AA05FE32820060Query Timer 0AA0400000000AE
AA05FE32820161Query Timer 1AA0400000000AE
AA05FE32820F6FQuery Timer 15AA0400000000AE

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Relay Timer Calibration and Accuracy

As mentioned earlier, relay timers are simulated in firmware, operating as a background process called by a timer interrupt.  ProXR controllers use an external system clock to maintain a 3% timing accuracy, not to be confused with a real time clock (RTC).  Since relay timers are derived from the system clock, it would stand to reason that relay timers maintain a 3% accuracy as well.  However, the CPU that powers ProXR controllers handles many interrupts on a priority basis, which can further deviate the accuracy to the timers.  ProXR relay timers are best suited for applications that do not require precise timing.  For instance, activating a porch light for 30 minutes, or closing a gate after 2 minutes, or ringing a school bell for 20 seconds.  These applications don’t really care if the timing is off by a few seconds.

Perhaps one of the most useful features of Relay Timers include the timer calibration function.  Timer calibration can be used to define the length of a second, as seen by the timer.  By lowering the timer calibration value, the timer can be accelerated.  Similarly, increasing the timer calibration value can greatly increase the length of a single second.  This feature is particularly useful if you need to control timing operations at a higher resolution.  Some customers have lowered these values to increase timing precision with great success.

Users may experiment with timer calibration in the “Timer Calibration” control panel.  This control panel allows you to experiment with activating 1, 8, or 16 timers simultaneously, testing short and long durations so you can see the actual effects of your settings over longer time periods.  Please note, since computers are interrupt driven, timing accuracy of the software is limited.

Be sure to write down your favorite calibration setting, as it will be necessary to use the “Device Configuration” control panel to store your timer values.

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Relay Timer Samples Control Panel

The “Relay Timer Samples” control panel demonstrates a few use case scenarios for timers.  This control panel does not introduce any new commands, and is intended for demonstration purposes only.

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Relay Power-up Memory

Relay Power-up and Status Map

ProXR controllers allow you to read the on/off status one bank of relays or 32 banks of relays at a time.  Reading the current status of relays will incate the on/off status of all relays at any given time while reading the power-up status will indicate the on/off status of relays when power is first applied to the controller.

The last 4 commands in the sample return 35 bytes, beginning with a 170 header byte, followed by a value of 32 indicating the number of data bytes to expect, followed by 32 relay status bytes beginning with Bank 1, and concluding with a checksum value, which is the 8-bit sum of all previous bytes.

Hex Version of Above Table
32x = 32 Bytes Returned by this Command
CK = Checksum (00-FF)
-- = Skip
TX:23456CKFunctionRX:23CK
AA03FE7C01--28Read the Current Status of Relay Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE7C02--29Read the Current Status of Relay Bank 2AA0100AB
AA03FE8F01--3BRead the Power-Up Status of Relay Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FE8F02--3CRead the Power-Up Status of Relay Bank 2AA0100AB
AA03FE7C00--27Read the Current Status of Relay Banks 1-32AA2332xCK
AA04FE7C000129Read the Current Status of Relay Banks 33-64AA2332xCK
AA03FE8F00--3ARead the Power-Up Status of Relay Banks 1-32AA2332xCK
AA04FE8F00013CRead the Power-Up Status of Relay Banks 33-64AA2332xCK

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Analog to Digital Converters

8-Channel Analog to Digital Converters

Select ProXR Series controllers are equipped with eight on-board analog to digital converters.  ADCs can be used to read many kinds of analog sensors as well as switches.  ADCs are available on all ProXR Lite series controllers as well as ProXR series that begin with ZAD in the part number.  This section of our tutorial will not apply to ProXR series with part numbers beginning with ZUXP.

ADCs are very sensitive to voltages, as their entire purpose is to convert a voltage from 0 to 5 volts into a value from 0 to 255 when using 8-Bit conversion mode (10-Bit mode converts voltages into values from 0 to 2047).  Analog inputs should never be left in a “floating” state.  In other words, they should be connected at all times to a voltage source or ground to keep the quiet.

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Pull Up/Down Jumper

ProXR controllers use eight 10K resistors to “pull” the inputs high (+5V) or low (Ground).  The integrated resistor network will ensure all inputs are always connected to ground or 5V using the “Pull Up/Down” jumper (as labeled on the circuit board).  Installing the jumper in the “Up” position will pull the analog inputs to 5V through the 10K resistor.  Likewise, installing this jumper in the “Down” position will pull the inputs to ground.  The default jumper setting is in the “Up” position.  This will allow the analog inputs to directly connect to switches, which is very useful if you need to manually control a relay from an analog input (See “AD8 Relay Activator / Event Generator” later in this guide).

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Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC) Commands (8-Bit)

The following commands demonstrate the 8-Bit AD8 command set.

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234CKFUNCTION: ADC 8-BITRX:23CK
AA02FE9640Read ADC Input 1AA01FFAA
AA02FE9741Read ADC Input 2AA01FFAA
AA02FE9842Read ADC Input 3AA01FFAA
AA02FE9943Read ADC Input 4AA01FFAA
AA02FE9A44Read ADC Input 5AA01FFAA
AA02FE9B45Read ADC Input 6AA01FFAA
AA02FE9C46Read ADC Input 7AA01FFAA
AA02FE9D47Read ADC Input 8AA01FFAA

Read All 8 Analog Inputs with 8-Bit Result per Channel:

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234CKFunction:RX:2C1C2C3C4C5C6C7C8CK
AA02FEA650Read All 8-ChannelsAA08FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFAA

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Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC) Commands (10-Bit)

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234CKFUNCTION: ADC 8-BITRX:223CK
AA02FE9E48Read ADC Input 1AA0203FFAE
AA02FE9F49Read ADC Input 2AA0203FFAE
AA02FEA04ARead ADC Input 3AA0203FFAE
AA02FEA14BRead ADC Input 4AA0203FFAE
AA02FEA24CRead ADC Input 5AA0203FFAE
AA02FEA34DRead ADC Input 6AA0203FFAE
AA02FEA44ERead ADC Input 7AA0203FFAE
AA02FEA54FRead ADC Input 8AA0203FFAE

The following command will return 16 bytes of data.  Data is arranged in numeric order (C1-C8) from channel 1 to channel 8.  Each channel is represented as a 10-Bit value (MSB and LSB).  The Checksum is represented in the CK column.

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234CKFunction:RX:2MSBLSBNOTE
AA02FEA750Read All 8-ChannelsAA1003FFBytes 3/4 AD1
03FFBytes 5/6 AD2
03FFBytes 7/8 AD3
03FFBytes 9/10 AD4
03FFBytes 11/12 AD5
03FFBytes 13/14 AD6
03FFBytes 15/16 AD7
03FFBytes 17/18 AD8
CAByte 19 Checksum
Converting MSB and LSB into an Integer:
The tables above demonstrate how 10-Bit data is communicated using 8-Bit values.  To convert the 8-Bit values into a usable integer, follow this simple formula:
Analog Value = (MSB x 256)  + LSB
Analog Value = (3 x 256) + 255
Analog Value = 1023

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Controlling Relays from Inputs

AD8 Relay Activator / Event Generator

ProXR Lite and ZAD Series controllers include a Relay Activator and Event Generator configuration option.  This control panel is used to mondify memory, allowing users to control relays based on analog inputs.  This allows manual control of relays, which may be helpful in certain applications.  The event generator is very easy to use, as each analog input can be configured to perform a specific function.  By default, analog inputs don’t do anything.  However, users have many options to control relays when inputs change state.  Relay control is limited to the first 8 relays only for most functions, so users of larger relay controllers should plan manual activation events on the first 8 relays (Relay Bank 1 as marked on the circuit board).
To use this control panel users should set the Pull Jumper in the “Up” position.  
Be sure to click “Save Settings” anytime you make a change to this control panel.

Function 0: Do Nothing
Function 0 does nothing, this is the default setting.

Function 1-8: Momentary Relay Control
This function allows momentary control of relays based on input status.  When configured, the relay will activate when the analog input is connected to ground.

Function 9-16: Toggle Relay Control
This function allows users to toggle relays based on inputs.  When configured, the relay state will toggle each time there is a connection between input and ground.  Connect to a button for a “Push On/Push Off” relay control operation.

Function 17-24: Turn On Relay
Activate a Relay when inputs are configured using these function values.  When configured, the relay will activate when the input is connection to ground.  The relay will not be turned off using this command, this is a ON ONLY command.

Function 25-32: Turn Off Relay
Deactivate a Relay when inputs are configured using these function values.  When configured, the relay will deactivate when the input is connection to ground.  The relay will not be turned on using this command, this is a OFF ONLY command.

Function 33-40: Momentary Relay Flash
Flash a Relay when inputs are configured using these function values.  When configured, the relay will flash on and off while the input is connection to ground, the relay will stop flashing when the input is disconnected from ground.

Function 41-48: Toggle Relay Flash
Toggle a Flashing Relay when inputs are configured using these function values.  When configured, the relay will begin flashing once the input connects to ground.  Disconnect the input from ground, then reconnect the input to ground to stop the flashing operation.  Put simply, connect a button between the input and ground.  Push the button, the relay will flash.  Push the button again, the relay will stop flashing.

Function 49: Turn Off Relay Banks 1-4
Turn off relay banks 1-4 (32 relays) when inputs are configured using these function values.  When configured, all 32 relays will turn off each time there is a connection between input and ground.  This is a OFF ONLY command.

Function 50: Turn On Relay Banks 1-4
Turn on relay banks 1-4 (32 relays) when inputs are configured using these function values.  When configured, all 32 relays will turn on each time there is a connection between input and ground.  This is a ON ONLY command.

Function 51: Banks 1-4 Follow the Input Status (almost)
This is a relatively unusual command, users should experiment with it to see what it does.  Think of it as a bonus command, perhaps it will be useful for someone.

Send API Event:
ProXR AD8 Series controllers have the ability to send simple push notification data when a change is detected on the inputs.  When the drop down menu is configured to “Send Event on Port 1”, the controller will generate a packet of data reflecting the state of all inputs.  Simply monitor the data sent from the controller while connecting one or more inputs to ground to see the push notification data.

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XR Expansion Port

XR Relay Expansion Port

ProXR controllers (excluding ProXR Lite) include a XR Relay Expansion port.  This expansion port allows you to control more relays by adding expansion boards.  The XR port allows you to mix high-power and low-power relays together.  Easily add or mix signals relays, power relays, and solid state relays using the XR Expansion port.  ProXR controllers provide firmware support for control of 64 relay banks (512 relays).  However, it should be stated that due to EMI and cable distance limitations, it may not be possible to achieve a full 512 relay configuration.  As a general rule, the XR bus should extend no more than 3 feet from the main controller.  This length includes cabling AND the length of the relay expansion boards added together.  Anything beyond 3 feet should be considered experimental, and may prove unreliable for some applications.

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UXP Expansion Port

UXP Expansion Port

Select ProXR series controllers that contain UXP in the part number include a UXP expansion port.  These controllers have different firmware that support compatible UXP expansion boards, allowing you to add Contact Closure Inputs, Potentiometer Outputs, and High-Resolution Analog to Digital Converters.  This section of our tutorial will demonstrate each of the expansion boards, and the commands associated with these expansions.  Please note that only one type of expansion is permitted on the UXP port.  For instance, if you choose Contact Closure inputs, then all expansions most be a contact closure input.  It is not possible to mix expansion types on the UXP port.  Also note that UXP controllers do not support any of the AD8 features mentioned above, including the AD8 activator features.

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UXP Contact Closure Input Expansion

The UXP expansion port found on ProXR series controllers (equipped with a UXP port) support contact closure inputs.  These controllers allow you to connect buttons, switches, motion detectors, or any other type of contact closure input to your relay controller.  UXP series controllers are able to be read the contact closure inputs based on a polled protocol.  Polling is the process of asking the controller the current state of the contact closure inputs and receiving a reply.  Push notification is not supported for any UXP expansions.  Since inputs on this expansion will not accept voltages on the inputs, users should exercise caution when connecting external devices.

The following commands demonstrate how to read contact closure inputs from ProXR controllers equipped with UXP hardware and firmware.  A Bank (B) of 8 inputs is read for each request.  Each of 8 inputs is represented in standard byte format as part of the data returned (R) from the controller.  The Most Significant Bit of the returned data (R) represents Input 8 while the Least Significant Bit of the returned data (R) represents input 1.

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
B = Bank
R = Read Value from Controller
TX:234BCKFunction:RX:2RCK
AA03FEAF005ARead Contact Closure Input Bank 1AA0100AB
AA03FEAF015BRead Contact Closure Input Bank 2AA0100AB
AA03FEAF025CRead Contact Closure Input Bank 3AA0100AB
AA03FEAF035DRead Contact Closure Input Bank 4AA0100AB
AA03FEAF045ERead Contact Closure Input Bank 5AA0100AB

Users may also request more than one bank at a time by specifying a start bank (S) and a count (C).  The start (S) bank is a value from 0 to 255 and the count (C) bank is a value of 0 to 31.  The Count (C) is added to the start bank, so the first example should be interpreted to mean: Read Contact Closure Inputs Starting (S) with Bank 0 and add a count (C) of 2 more banks for a total of 3 banks (24 total inputs).

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
S = Start Bank
C = Count Banks Above Start
R = Read Value from Controller
-- = Skip
TX:234SCCKFUNCTION: READ CONTACT CLOSURE BANKSRX:2RRRRRRRCK
AA04FEAF00025DStart at Bank 0 and Read 2 More BanksAA03000000--------AD
AA04FEAF01035FStart at Bank 1 and Read 3 More BanksAA0400000000------AE
AA04FEAF020461Start at Bank 2 and Read 4 More BanksAA050000000000----AF
AA04FEAF030563Start at Bank 3 and Read 5 More BanksAA06000000000000--B0
AA04FEAF040665Start at Bank 4 and Read 6 More BanksAA0700000000000000B1

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UXP Analog to Digital Conversion (8/12-Bit)

The UXP expansion port found on ProXR series controllers (equipped with a UXP port) support up to 48 Channels of Analog to Digital Conversion with 12-Bit resolution.  These controllers allow you to read analog voltages from 0 to 5VDC, ideal for sensor monitoring applications.  UXP series controllers are able to be read ADC inputs based on a polled protocol.  Polling is the process of asking the controller the current voltage on any of the inputs and receiving a reply.  Push notification is not supported for any UXP expansions.  Users should exercise caution not to exceed 5VDC on any of the analog inputs to prevent permanent damage.

The ADC Inputs are divided into (I) Inputs and Devices (See Function Column).  Each devices has 16 available inputs (I), which will return (R) a standard 8-bit value based on the voltage present on the input at the time of reading.  Up to 3 devices are supported per UXP port for a total of 16 inputs per device, or 48 total available input channels.

The following commands demonstrate how to read individual analog inputs in 8-Bit mode from ProXR controllers equipped with UXP hardware and firmware:

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
I = Input
R = Return Value

TX:234ICKFUNCTION: READ 8-BIT ADC DEVICE 0RX:2RCK
AA03FEC3006ERead ADC Input Channel 0 8-BitAA01FFAA
AA03FEC30F7DRead ADC Input Channel 15 8-BitAA01FFAA
TX:234ICKFUNCTION: READ 8-BIT ADC DEVICE 1RX:2RCK
AA03FECB0076Read ADC Input Channel 0 8-BitAA01FFAA
AA03FECB0F85Read ADC Input Channel 15 8-BitAA01FFAA
TX:234ICKFUNCTION: READ 8-BIT ADC DEVICE 2RX:2RCK
AA03FED0007BRead ADC Input Channel 0 8-BitAA01FFAA
AA03FED00F8ARead ADC Input Channel 15 8-BitAA01FFAA

The following commands will read all 16 channels at 8-Bit resolution:

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234CKFUNCTION: READ 16 CHANNELS 8-BITRX:2ValueNOTE
AA02FEC06ARead ADC Device 0, 16 ChannelsAA10FFBytes 3 Channel 0
AA02FEC16BRead ADC Device 1, 16 ChannelsAA10FFBytes 4 Channel 1
AA02FEC26CRead ADC Device 2, 16 ChannelsAA10FFBytes 5 Channel 2
FFBytes 6 Channel 3
FFBytes 7 Channel 4
FFBytes 8 Channel 5
FFBytes 9 Channel 6
FFBytes 10 Channel 7
FFBytes 11 Channel 8
FFBytes 12 Channel 9
FFBytes 13 Channel 10
FFBytes 14 Channel 11
FFBytes 15 Channel 12
FFBytes 16 Channel 13
FFBytes 17 Channel 14
FFBytes 18 Channel 15
AAByte 19 Checksum

The following samples read individual channels with 12-bit resolution.  These commands return 2 bytes, LSB and MSB.  The actual returned value can be computed using the following equation:
AD Value = (MSB x 256) + LSB

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
I = Input
LSB = Least Significant Byte of Return Value
MSB = Most Significant Byte of Return Value

TX:234ICKFUNCTION: READ 12-BIT ADC DEVICE 0RX:2LSBMSBCK
AA03FEC70072Read ADC Input Channel 0 12-BitAA02FF0FBA
AA03FEC70F81Read ADC Input Channel 15 12-BitAA02FF0FBA
TX:234ICKFUNCTION: READ 12-BIT ADC DEVICE 1RX:2LSBMSBCK
AA03FECF007ARead ADC Input Channel 0 12-BitAA02FF0FBA
AA03FECF0F89Read ADC Input Channel 15 12-BitAA02FF0FBA
TX:234ICKFUNCTION: READ 12-BIT ADC DEVICE 2RX:2LSBMSBCK
AA03FED1007CRead ADC Input Channel 0 12-BitAA02FF0FBA
AA03FED10F8BRead ADC Input Channel 15 12-BitAA02FF0FBA

The following commands read 16 channels at 12-Bit resolution, returning a total of 32 bytes:

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
TX:234CKFUNCTION: READ 16 CHANNELS 12-BITRX:2LSBMSBNOTE
AA02FEC46ERead ADC Device 0, 16 ChannelsAA10FF0FBytes 3/4 Channel 0
AA02FEC56FRead ADC Device 1, 16 ChannelsAA10FF0FBytes 5/6 Channel 1
AA02FEC670Read ADC Device 2, 16 ChannelsAA10FF0FBytes 7/8 Channel 2
FF0FBytes 9/10 Channel 3
FF0FBytes 11/12 Channel 4
FF0FBytes 13/14 Channel 5
FF0FBytes 15/16 Channel 6
FF0FBytes 17/18 Channel 7
FF0FBytes 19/20 Channel 8
FF0FBytes 21/22 Channel 9
FF0FBytes 23/24 Channel 10
FF0FBytes 25/26 Channel 11
FF0FBytes 27/28 Channel 12
FF0FBytes 29/30 Channel 13
FF0FBytes 31/32 Channel 14
FF0FBytes 33/34 Channel 15
AAByte 35 Checksum

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UXP Digital Potentiometers (8-Bit)

The UXP expansion port found on ProXR series controllers (equipped with a UXP port) support the ability to control digital potentiometers.  Use the digital pot expansion boards for tuning of external analog circuits, audio control applications, or scientific control and simulation applications.  Digital potentiometers offer 8-bit resolution with the ability to control many channels individually or simultaneously.  Digital potentiometer outputs are available in 10K, 50K, and 100K ohm resistance.  Digital potentiometers are limited to working with analog circuits in the 0 to 5V range, and are current limited to 1ma per channel.  Exceeding the voltage or current on any of the potentiometers may result in permanent damage.

The following commands demonstrate how to control digital potentiometers from ProXR controllers equipped with UXP hardware and firmware using the Channel (C) and Value (V) parameters.  The channel value is used to identify which potentiometer you would like to control.  The value parameter controls the wiper of the potentiometer.  A value of 0 set the wiper all the way to the left.  A value of 128 moves the wiper to the center position.  A value of 255 move the wiper all the way to the right.  Note, as with most potentiometers, there are 3 contact points per potentiometer.

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
C = Channel
V = Value
TX:234CVCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA04FEAA004096Set Potentiometer Output 0 to 64 (25%)AA015500
AA04FEAA0080D6Set Potentiometer Output 0 to 128 (50%)AA015500
AA04FEAA00FF55Set Potentiometer Output 0 to 255 (100%)AA015500
AA04FEAA014097Set Potentiometer Output 1 to 64 (25%)AA015500
AA04FEAA0280D8Set Potentiometer Output 2 to 128 (50%)AA015500
AA04FEAA03FF58Set Potentiometer Output 3 to 255 (100%)AA015500

Users may want to set all potentiometer outputs simultaneously:

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
V = Value
TX:234VCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA03FEAB4096Set All Potentiometer Outputs to 64 (25%)AA015500
AA03FEAB80D6Set All Potentiometer Outputs to 128 (50%)AA015500
AA03FEABFF55Set All Potentiometer Outputs to 255 (100%)AA015500

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Configuration and Run Modes

Program/Run Jumper: Configuration and Run Modes

ProXR Controllers have two modes of operation: Configuration and Run
Run Mode is for daily use.  Your controller should remain in Run Mode most of the time, as this will prevent writing to the internal EEPROM memory, which could accidentally change important settings that could result in a complete loss of communications.
Configuration Mode unlocks important sections of memory, allowing settings to be altered.
There are two ways to change modes on ProXR series controllers: Software and Hardware
Changing modes in hardware is very easy, simply move the PGM/RUN jumper to the desired setting.
Changing modes in software requires you to send a few commands, along with a duration (D) of time (in seconds), indicating how long you would like the controller to remain in configuration mode.  You may set the duration (D) to 0 if you would like to cancel the timer and return to Run mode.

CK = Checksum (00-FF)
D = Duration
TX:23456DCKFunction:RX:23CK
AA05FE218C563CECConfiguration Mode for 60 SecondsAA015601
AA05FE218C56FFAFConfiguration Mode for 255 SecondsAA015601
AA05FE218C5600B0Cancel Configuration ModeAA015500
Hint: Should you ever loose communication with your controller, remove power, move the Jumper to Program Mode, power up the controller again.  Your ProXR controller will return to safe settings so you may recover your settings using our Base Station software.  

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