Industrial Vibration Sensor V3 Product Manual

Introduction

1

  • Industrial Grade 3-axis Vibration Sensor with ±16g Range
  • Calculates RMS, MAX, and MIN g Vibration
  • Noise Removal using Low-pass Filter
  • Frequency Range (Bandwidth) up to 6400 Hz In Processed Mode
  • Frequency Range (Bandwidth) up to 8,000 Hz In Time Domain Mode
  • Sample Rate up to 25,600Hz
  • Time Domain Data for FFT analysis
  • Encrypted Communication with 2 Mile Wireless Range
  • Operating Temperature Range -40 to +85 °C
  • Wall-Mounted or Magnet Mounted IP65 Rated Enclosure
  • Example Software for Visual Studio and LabVIEW
  • Vibration Sensor with External Probe Option
  • Up to 500,000 Transmissions from 4 AA Batteries
  • Many Gateway and Modem Options Available

Introducing NCD’s Long Range Industrial IoT wireless vibration and temperature sensor, boasting up to a 2 Mile range using a wireless mesh networking architecture. Incorporating a 16-bit Vibration and Temperature sensor, this sensor transmits highly accurate vibration data at user-defined intervals.

During Power-Up, this vibration sensor learns “normal” base-line vibration from the monitored device.  This base-line vibration is subtracted from regular sampled vibration readings to improve relevant vibration data.  Ideally, the monitored device should be off while the sensor is learning.  Once the sensor stabilizes and starts sending data, the device/machinery being monitored can be powered on.

This Industrial IoT wireless vibration sensor samples 3-axis of Vibration data for 900ms and then calculates RMS, Maximum, and Minimum vibration readings. This sensor combines these data with temperature data in a data packet, and transmits the result to modems and gateways within wireless range.  Once transmission is complete, the vibration sensor goes back to sleep, thus minimizing power consumption.

Powered by just 4 AA batteries and an operational lifetime of 500,000 wireless transmissions, a 10 years battery life can be expected depending on environmental conditions and the data transmission interval.  Optionally, this sensor may be externally powered, making it an ideal choice for wireless vibration monitoring system for industrial equipment.

With an open communication protocol, this sensor transmits hardware encrypted data that can be integrated with just about any control system or gateway.  Data can be transmitted to a PC, a Raspberry Pi, to Losant IoT cloud, Microsoft® Azure® IoT, and an embedded system all at the same time. Sensor parameters and wireless transmission settings can be changed using our free LabVIEW® monitoring software on a desktop PC.

The long range, price, accuracy, battery life and security features of Wireless Vibration Sensor makes it an affordable choice which exceeds the requirements for most of the industrial as well as consumer market applications.

Specifications

SpecificationsMinimumNominalMaximumNotes
Transmission Rating500,000Total Number of Wireless Transmissions When Using 4 AA Batteries
Batteries266May be Powered by 2 or 4 AA Batteries
Battery Life 1 TPD10 YearsTPD Transmissions per Day
Battery Life 3 TPD8 YearsTPD Transmissions per Day
Battery Life 6 TPD4 YearsTPD Transmissions per Day
Battery Life 12 TPD2 YearsTPD Transmissions per Day
Battery Life 24 TPD1 YearTPD Transmissions per Day
Width3.54"
Length4.52"
Height2.16"
Enclosure RatingIP65, NEMA 1,2,4,4X,12,13, UL-508
Temperature Rating-40° C23° C85° CComponent Rating
Tested Temperature0° C23° C40° CAs Tested by NCD Staff
Probe Temperature-40° C23° C105° CAs Tested by NCD Staff
X Vibration Range-16g+16g
Y Vibration Range-16g+16g
Z Vibration Range-16g+16g
X Velocity Range0-655mm/sec
Y Velocity Range0-655mm/sec
Z Velocity Range0-655mm/sec
X Displacement Range0-655mm
Y Displacement Range0-655mm
Y Displacement Range0-655mm
Sample Rate 100hz1600hz12.8KhzVibration Sensor Data Rate
Frequency Range ( Processed Mode) 1.56hz400hz3200hzFreq range should be equal or greater than machine RPM
Frequency Range ( Time Domain Mode) 0.56hz800hz8,000hz
Sample Duration1sec1sec10secDevice will take readings for the set time and then send over wireless
Time Domain DataYes
FiltersYes
Mounting 1/4 NPT
1/4-28 UNF
Magnet Mount
FFTYes
Notes:
Use Energizer Ultimate Lithium ONLY for Extreme Temperatures
All Ratings are for 6 Batteries
Actual Battery Life is Dependent On Transmission Interval
Battery Shelf Life Does Not Exceed 10 Years Therefore NCD Does Not Rate Battery Life Beyond the Shelf Life of Available Batteries
** Battery life will significantly reduce when time domain mode is enabled

Quick Start Guide

2

The following Quick Start Guide will help get you started using NCD Long Range Wireless Sensors.  Please keep in mind, this section is intended for users who are using factory new condition sensors.  If you have altered sensor settings, this Quick Start Guide may not work without taking further steps.  Please note this Quick Start Guide is not intended to replace the documentation and many details have been skipped to help get you running quickly.  If you encounter problems during this Quick Start Guide, please be sure to review the entire document for a more complete overview of the product.

Requirements

Before getting started, you will need the following items:

  1. One or More Long Range Wireless Sensors
  2. One USB Modem for Receiving Sensor Data
  3. A Windows 10 PC with One Available USB Port
  4. Alpha Station Software (free from https://ncd.io/alpha)

Step 1: Plug in your USB Modem

Device Manager

In the Search Box of Windows 10, type “Device Manager”.  Open the “Ports (COM & LPT) section.  This will display all registered COM port devices with your computer.  Plug the USB Modem into the USB Port of your Computer. Most Windows 10 Computers include the USB Driver for the NCD modem, but if you have any driver problems installing the modem, please download the FTDI Drivers for the modem from the following link.  A new COM Port will appear in the list once the Modem is registered with your computer.  Please take note of the COM port as it will be used in Step 2.

Step 2: Run Alpha Station

Alpha Port Selection

Download, Install, and Run Alpha Station onto your Windows 10 PC. The Alpha Station Quick Start Guide may be viewed here.  With Alpha Station Running, select the COM port of your modem and click “OK” then click on “Sensor View & Setup”.

Step 3: Turn On the Sensor

NCD Long Range Sensors must be turned On as they are shipped powered down to prevent battery depletion.  Open up the top of the Sensor and move the switch to the “On” or “PS” position (depending on your particular sensor).  NCD IoT Sensors send a transmission on Power-Up and then go back to sleep for a pre-set duration.  After this duration has expired, the sensor will wake up, send a transmission, and go back to sleep.

Step 4: Review Incoming Data

Alpha Station will start to list data from sensors as shown (left).  If “Unknown Data Source” in the Sensor Readings column is displayed, Alpha Station may require an update (Click Here for the latest version of Alpha Station).

Alpha Station Sensor Data

Step 5: Sensor Configuration (Optional)

Alpha Station may also be used to configure general sensor settings.  This is an optional step that can greatly affect battery life.  Most NCD sensors wake up every 10 minutes, take a sample, send a transmission, and go back to sleep for another 10 minutes.  Some of our sensors have a preset interval to 30 minutes.  The sleep interval may be changed using Alpha Station by clicking the “Setup” button as shown in the screen shot above.  The Setup button is used to configure basic settings common to all NCD Long Range Wireless sensors.  The topic of sensor configuration is covered in greater detail in the Alpha Station guide.

Applications

3

  • Wireless Industrial Machine Health Analysis
  • Machine Fault detection
  • Frequency Analysis of Vibration data
  • Building and Structural Monitoring

Hardware

4

Sensor Hardware

The vibration Sensor hardware can be divided into two parts. 

A. Main Electronics Box — This box ( White Box) contains Electronics such as MCU, Radio Module, Power Circuitry, Power Control unit, Status LED, on/off Switch, Configuration Button etc.

B. The Probe — The probe is made of steel. It contain the Vibration sensor and the temperature Sensor.  It comes with 3 mounting option such as 1/4 NPT, 1/4-28 UNF and magnetic Mount. The sensor cable length is 2meter and its shielded twisted pair wire cable. 

 

Sensor Diagram

Sensor Power

This Sensor has two power option.

  1. Powered by AA batteries ( any AA batteries cab be used , ncd recommends Energizer L91 batteries) 
  2. External Power Supply ( 5-12VDC)

Sensor Radio Technology

NCD Long Range Wireless Sensors are available with many radio options, which should be carefully chosen based on the country of installation. NCD uses Digi radios exclusively because of their best-in-class range, reliability, wide operating temperature, and low power operation. Please note that not all options are legal for use in all areas, so it’s important to make the right selection during purchase.  NCD manufactures sensors based on the radio options chosen, we do not typically restrict radios to certain countries so please check local laws BEFORE purchase.  Here, we will explain the radio options in greater detail to help guide users into the correct radio based on installation country.

900MHz for Use in the United States

If NCD sensors will be installed within the United States, the 900MHz (North America) option is the best choice, offering the longest possible range of up to 2 Miles Line of Sight and up to 28 Miles using High-Gain Antennas.  This option can typically work up to 1,000 feet indoors (depending on building materials, concrete and steel building typically reduce the operational range significantly).  This option is typically not legal for use outside North America.

868MHz Module

868MHz for Use in Europe

If NCD sensors will be installed in Europe, the 868MHz (Europe Only) option is the best choice, offering the longest possible range of up to 14.5km Line of Sight.  This option is typically not legal for use outside of Europe.

2.4GHz Module

2.4GHz for Worldwide Use

The 2.4GHz Option is generally legal for use in most countries, including Europe and the United States and offers a range of up to 2 Miles (3200 Meters) Line of Sight or up to 300 feet (about 90 Meters) indoors.  Because of the widespread use of 2.4GHz, the rated ranges are rarely achieved.  The 900MHz and 868MHz communication modules are a far better choice for users in the United States and Europe respectively.  Users who may require worldwide compliance should use the 2.4GHz option, but this option should be considered if the above options are not legal for use.

Sensor Internal Overview

The Vibration Sensor V3 has two Key components. 

A. Main Sensor Body – The main sensor Body contains MCU, Power Supply, Radio module, Status LED, Batteries, power on/off Switch and other electronics. 

 

B. Sensor Probe – The probe is made of stainless steel. Inside the probe there is a Vibration sensor and Temperature Sensor. The probe Length is around 2meter. The probe can be mounted using a Magnetic attachment, 1/4-28 UNF, and 1/4 NPT.  

 

Status LED – The status led is used to indicate errors or other sensor diagnostics.

LED Blink Once – Message was sent successfully and no error in last sensor read as well in data transmission

LED Blink Twice and then One more time —  Message was sent successfully but there was an error in last sensor read

LED blink Thrice — MCU is having issue communicating with Radio Module 

Receiving Sensor Data

5

NCD IoT Sensors require a receiving device to receive sensor telemetry.  Since NCD IoT sensors broadcast sensor data, any number of receivers may be used to receive sensor telemetry.  Similarly, multiple types of receiving devices may be used for different applications.  For instance, modems may be used for receiving sensor data on a local computer.  The same installation may also benefit from having a Micro Gateway for forwarding sensor telemetry directly to a popular cloud platform such as AWS, Azure, or MQTT.  The same installation may also benefit from having a IoT Edge Computer for localized data processing and forwarding data using LTE Cellular Connectivity.  All of these receivers may be used simultaneously, redundantly, or individually, depending on application requirements.  In this section, we will discuss the different types of receivers, how to use them, and when to use them.

Good to Know!

Regardless of your application requirements, no less than one USB modem should always be available for troubleshooting, sensor configuration, and recovery of sensor settings.  Please be sure to have a USB modem available as a basic requirement for using the NCD ecosystem of IoT Sensors.  We also advise using Alpha Station to help with basic sensor configuration and troubleshooting.  Alpha Station is available as a free download from https://ncd.io/alpha.

Using Modems

Modems allow local computers to receive NCD Sensor Telemetry from a range of up to 2 Miles Line of Sight.  Data from the sensor will arrive at the wireless modem as raw bytes of data that must be parsed into meaningful sensor values.  Alpha Station software makes it easy to view sensor data in both raw and parsed format.  Alpha Station includes source code that provides meaningful samples for how data should be parsed and converted into real-world values.

Modems are useful in applications that require a local PC to receive and handle data.  They also offer a low-cost connectivity option for users who wish to integrated their own software into the NCD ecosystem of long range wireless sensors.  Because there are many connectivity options for interface to a PC, NCD offers several modem options with popular interface technologies such as USB, RS-232, Ethernet, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and RS-485.

There is no limit to the number of sensors that may be used with a single modem.  However, if you plan to send data frequently from one or more sensors, the wireless bandwidth will become congested and data packet loss may occur.  In applications where each sensor is set to transmit every 10 minutes or longer, we recommend using one modem for every 128 sensors.  Using the Pan ID features of the Modem and Sensors, groups may be defined allowing multiple groups of 128 sensors.

Experienced users may use modems as a cloud connectivity option.  NCD does not actively support this configuration as NCD Gateways are a much better choice for integrating NCD sensors directly to cloud platforms.   However, modems make a lot of sense for installations that already have a gateway and need a simple interface solution to the NCD ecosystem of long range wireless sensors.

USB Modem Requirement

As mentioned above, the USB Modem is an essential tool for device configuration, diagnostics, and recovery.  Regardless of your application, at some point a USB Modem is likely to be needed and should be considered a requirement to have at least one on hand when working with NCD sensors.

The USB Modem mounts as a virtual COM port on your PC and uses a FTDI chip for Serial to USB conversion.  Drivers are available here if required, but most PCs recognize the USB Modem and will install drivers automatically.  While Alpha Station may be used to examine sensor data, raw data is available to the user by simply displaying all bytes received when opening the Virtual Com Port at 115.2K Baud, 8 Data Bits, 1 Stop Bit, No Parity.  Since data is transferred as byte values, terminal windows such a HyperTerminal are not an ideal choice for viewing incoming data unless as these terminals are designed to display ASCII text.  Some terminal software may offer settings for viewing raw byte values.  We still recommend using Alpha Station as a learning tool for NCD wireless sensors as users will have the ability to display raw data as well as parsed data.

For specific instructions on using each modem, please review the relevant modem documentation below:

Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, USB Modem (MegaModem)

RS-232 Modem

RS-485 Modem

The above video demonstrates the USB Modem and how it may be used with NCD Long Range Wireless Sensors.

The above video demonstrates the Ethernet Modem and how it may be used with NCD Long Range Wireless Sensors.

IoT Sensor Sends Data to Modem that Connects to Ethernet USB RS-485 Bluetooth and WiFi

Sensor

2-Mile Range

Modem

Raw Sensor Data
USB, Ethernet, Wi-Fi,
Bluetooth, RS-232, RS-485

Interface to PC

Using Gateways

NCD Gateways were designed to work directly with popular cloud technologies such as AWS, Azure, and MQTT.   NCD Gateways receive Long Range Wireless Sensor data, Parse Incoming data, and Publish the converted results directly to your favorite cloud platform.  While the underlying protocol for communications to the cloud is MQTT, each cloud provider uses a different authentication method.  Each gateway supports the authentication method implemented by each cloud provider.  The MQTT Gateway includes standard authentication protocols implemented by most MQTT brokers.

Unlike Modems, NCD Micro Gateways may need periodic firmware updates to keep up with the latest NCD sensors.  Gateways exclusively use Wi-Fi for communications to popular cloud platforms.  Like modems, Gateways work up to 2 miles from the sensor (line of sight) depending on user-selected communication options.  Gateways offer a low-cost method of communicating to the cloud.  While there is no hard limit as to the number of supported sensors by a single Micro Gateway, we recommend using gateways in applications where 20 or less sensors are installed in a local area.  For larger installations, the IoT Edge Computer should be used to provide the needed horsepower.

IoT Sensor Sends Data to Gateway which Converts to Real-World Values and Sends to Microsoft Azure Amazon AWS Losant MQTT Broker Temboo Kosmos

Sensor

2-Mile Range

Gateway

Interpreted Sensor Data
Wi-Fi Interface

AWS, Azure, MQTT,
or Losant Cloud

Using IoT Edge Computers

The NCD IoT Edge Computer offers the most powerful interface available for NCD Long Range Wireless Sensors.  Like modems and gateways, the NCD Edge is capable of receiving sensor telemetry up to 2 miles away.  The Edge is a small Linux computer pre-loaded with Node-RED and NCD sensor libraries.  Raw sensor data is fed into Node-RED for processing, allowing the development of custom flows for a wide range of localized processing applications.

Integrated hardware makes it easy to send NCD sensor telemetry to AWS, Azure, Losant, or MQTT using Ethernet, Wi-Fi, or LTE communications.  Integrated OLED display indicates connection status while integrated USB port may be used sensor data logging to a thumb drive.  

Experience with Node-RED is a requirement for most users; however, NCD will consult with customers to provide custom Node-RED flows for specialized applications at additional cost.  

While the NCD IoT Edge Computer is commonly thought of as programmable interface technology for NCD Long Range Wireless Sensors, this device may also be used to communicate to USB, Wireless, and Ethernet relay controllers for sensor monitoring and control applications.  With additional customization, most of the NCD ecosystem of hardware may be controlled or monitored.

IoT Sensor Sends Data to Gateway which Converts to Real-World Values and Sends to Microsoft Azure Amazon AWS Losant MQTT Broker Temboo Kosmos

Sensor

2-Mile Range

IoT Edge Computer
Running Node-RED

Interpreted Sensor Data
Wi-Fi, Ethernet, LTE

AWS, Azure, MQTT,
or Losant Cloud

Software API Structure

6

Sensor Type 80 Transmission Structure

Field Value ( or Default )PayloadLengthDescription
Header7F1API Data Header ( its not the API Header)
Node ID001User Defined ID
Firmware Version011Device Firmware Version
Battery Level03,FE2Battery Voltage = 0.00322*(03*FF+FE)
Packet CounterDE1Wireless Transmission Counter
Sensor Type00,0x512Sensor Type 80
Error/Reserve Byte001
Mode Of Operation 000100- Processed
01- Raw
02 - On Demand
Data Rate0A11Vibration Sample Rate
Temperature MSB,LSB2,32Temp in C = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS ACC in X Axis in mgMSB,LSB4,52rms_acc_x_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
MAX ACC in X Axis in mgMSB,LSB6,72max_acc_x_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS Velocity in X Axis in mm/secMSB,LSB8,92rms_vel_x_mm_sec = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS Displacement in X Axis in mmMSB,LSB10,112rms_disp_x_mm = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of First Peak in X directionMSB,LSB12,132X1_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Second Peak in X directionMSB,LSB14,152X2_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Third Peak in X directionMSB,LSB16,172X3_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS ACC in Y Axis in mgMSB,LSB18,192rms_acc_y_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
MAX ACC in Y Axis in mgMSB,LSB20,212max_acc_y_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS Velocity in Y Axis in mm/secMSB,LSB22,232rms_vel_y_mm_sec = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS Displacement in Y Axis in mmMSB,LSB24,252rms_disp_y_mm = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of First Peak in Y directionMSB,LSB26,272Y1_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Second Peak in Y directionMSB,LSB28,292Y2_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Third Peak in Y directionMSB,LSB30,312Y3_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS ACC in Z Axis in mgMSB,LSB32,332rms_acc_z_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
MAX ACC in Z Axis in mgMSB,LSB34,352max_acc_z_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS Velocity in Z Axis in mm/secMSB,LSB36,372rms_vel_z_mm_sec = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS Displacement in Z Axis in mmMSB,LSB38,392rms_disp_z_mm = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of First Peak in Z directionMSB,LSB40,412Z1_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Second Peak in Z directionMSB,LSB42,432Z2_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Third Peak in Z directionMSB,LSB44,452Z3_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100

Sensor Transmission Structure RAW Mode

Field Description
01Mode Of Operation
0AODR
07two MSB bit of the Axis byte to indicate FSR And 3 LSB bits indicates Axis
13Hour
0BMinute
00,00Device Temperature
77Total Number of RF Packets
01Current Packet Count value
01 DEX-Axis RAW ACC Data
FF 7AY-Axis RAW ACC Data
3F 8BY-Axis RAW ACC Data

Sensor Type 81 Transmission Structure RAW Mode

Field Value ( or Default )LengthDescription
Header7F1API Data Header ( its not the API Header)
Node ID001User Defined ID
Firmware Version011Device Firmware Version
Battery Level03,FE2Battery Voltage = 0.00322*(03*FF+FE)
Packet CounterDE1Wireless Transmission Counter
Sensor Type00,0x512Sensor Type 80
Error/Reserve Byte001
Mode Of Operation 00100- Processed
01- Raw
02 - On Demand
Data Rate0A1Vibration Sample Rate
Temperature Sensor 1MSB,LSB2Temp in C = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS ACC in X Axis in mgMSB,LSB2rms_acc_x_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
MAX ACC in X Axis in mgMSB,LSB2max_acc_x_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS Velocity in X Axis in mm/secMSB,LSB2rms_vel_x_mm_sec = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS Displacement in X Axis in mmMSB,LSB2rms_disp_x_mm = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of First Peak in X directionMSB,LSB2X1_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Second Peak in X directionMSB,LSB2X2_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Third Peak in X directionMSB,LSB2X3_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS ACC in Y Axis in mgMSB,LSB2rms_acc_y_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
MAX ACC in Y Axis in mgMSB,LSB2max_acc_y_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS Velocity in Y Axis in mm/secMSB,LSB2rms_vel_y_mm_sec = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS Displacement in Y Axis in mmMSB,LSB2rms_disp_y_mm = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of First Peak in Y directionMSB,LSB2Y1_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Second Peak in Y directionMSB,LSB2Y2_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Third Peak in Y directionMSB,LSB2Y3_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS ACC in Z Axis in mgMSB,LSB2rms_acc_z_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
MAX ACC in Z Axis in mgMSB,LSB2max_acc_z_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS Velocity in Z Axis in mm/secMSB,LSB2rms_vel_z_mm_sec = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS Displacement in Z Axis in mmMSB,LSB2rms_disp_z_mm = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of First Peak in Z directionMSB,LSB2Z1_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Second Peak in Z directionMSB,LSB2Z2_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Third Peak in Z directionMSB,LSB2Z3_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Data Rate Sensor 20A1Vibration Sample Rate
Temperature Sensor 2MSB,LSB2Temp in C = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS ACC in X Axis in mg Sensor 2MSB,LSB2rms_acc_x_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
MAX ACC in X Axis in mg Sensor 2MSB,LSB2max_acc_x_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS Velocity in X Axis in mm/sec Sensor 2MSB,LSB2rms_vel_x_mm_sec = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS Displacement in X Axis in mm Sensor 2MSB,LSB2rms_disp_x_mm = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of First Peak in X direction Sensor 2 MSB,LSB2X1_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Second Peak in X direction Sensor 2MSB,LSB2X2_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Third Peak in X direction Sensor 2MSB,LSB2X3_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS ACC in Y Axis in mg Sensor 2MSB,LSB2rms_acc_y_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
MAX ACC in Y Axis in mg Sensor 2MSB,LSB2max_acc_y_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS Velocity in Y Axis in mm/sec Sensor 2MSB,LSB2rms_vel_y_mm_sec = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS Displacement in Y Axis in mm Sensor 2MSB,LSB2rms_disp_y_mm = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of First Peak in Y direction Sensor 2MSB,LSB2Y1_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Second Peak in Y direction Sensor 2MSB,LSB2Y2_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Third Peak in Y direction Sensor 2MSB,LSB2Y3_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS ACC in Z Axis in mg Sensor 2MSB,LSB2rms_acc_z_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
MAX ACC in Z Axis in mg Sensor 2MSB,LSB2max_acc_z_mg = MSB*FF+LSB
RMS Velocity in Z Axis in mm/sec Sensor 2MSB,LSB2rms_vel_z_mm_sec = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
RMS Displacement in Z Axis in mm Sensor 2MSB,LSB2rms_disp_z_mm = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of First Peak in Z direction Sensor 2MSB,LSB2Z1_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Second Peak in Z direction Sensor 2MSB,LSB2Z2_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100
Frequency of Third Peak in Z direction Sensor 2MSB,LSB2Z3_Hz = (MSB*FF+LSB)/100

Sensor Configuration Structure

The following guide demonstrates the fundamental configuration commands required to configure NCD Enterprise Low-Power Long Range Wireless Sensors.  A Wireless USB Modem will be required to configure NCD wireless sensors over a wireless connection.  The examples shown below assume prior knowledge of DigiMesh® API Packet Structure, including MAC addresses and checksum calculations.  We STRONGLY ADVISE using NCD Alpha Station software to configure sensors; however, if integration of sensor configuration is absolutely required, the commands shown below may be used.  

Please note the MAC address MUST be changed (shown in the API frames below as 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83) to match the MAC address of a remote sensor.  The checksum must also be re-calculated (the last byte of the API frame) to include the new MAC address.  Additionally, the PAN ID must be set to 0x7BCD.   This PAN ID is reserved for configuration ONLY, and may not be used for daily operation.  

A working sample of configuration with source code is available by downloading Alpha Station software.  Alpha Station includes an installer but also runs as editable source code under Microsoft Visual Studio Community Edition, a FREE download from Microsoft.  Alpha Station handles all configuration commands automatically and is capable of configuring every device that has been discovered.  

The commands shown below are explained in greater detail within product manuals, this guide is a summary overview of all configuration command samples.  Also note that configuration commands cannot be sent to NCD wireless sensors while in run mode.  Each sensor must be placed in configuration mode, which will drain the battery very quickly.  Be SURE to execute these commands quickly and return each sensor to RUN mode to preserve battery life.  Optionally, select NCD wireless sensors may be powered from a external power supply during configuration.

Enter Configuration Mode

Step 1 : Power up the sensor.

Step 2: Every sensor has 2 buttons: Reset and Configuration (RST and CFG).  Enter configuration mode by holding both buttons down.  Next, release the reset button.  Wait 6 seconds and release the CFG button.  The sensor will send a Configuration API frame, indicating configuration mode is active.  The API frame will look similar to this:

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C2 7A 00 00 00 23 00 00 50 47 4D 00 00 00 00 00 00 0A

Above command contains the sensor MAC address. This MAC address may be used to send future targeted commands to this particular sensor.

In the above case, the MAC address is:

00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83

Note: Throughout this guide we will be sending data in broadcast mode and sensors ID and node ID will be set to 0. This is done to make these commands work with all the sensors and all the nodes. These commands may be used with all the sensors without any change. 

For optimal performance keep only one sensor in config mode at a time.

Reminder: During configuration mode, the sensor PAN id needs to be set as 0x7BCD.  When using Alpha Station software, this operation is completed automatically during configuration.

Warning: Batteries will drain quickly in configuration mode.  Be sure to exit configuration mode as soon as possible by pressing and releasing the Reset (RST) Button on the sensor once configuration changes have been completed.

Read Sleep Duration

This command may be used to read the sensor sleep duration.  The sleep duration determines how frequently the sensor wakes up and send sensor data.  The interval is set in seconds.  Short intervals will drain the battery faster while longer intervals will provide a very long battery life.

Read Sleep Duration Command

7E 00 13 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 15 00 00 00 E8

In the above command the remote device address is set as broadcast. The address is:

00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF

When sending this command to a particular sensor, replace the MAC address of the sensor.  Again, the sensor MUST be in configuration mode.

The Wireless Sensor will respond with the stored delay value:

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C1 7C 00 02 00 0E 00 00 00 02 58 00 00 00 00 00 00 A6

From the above command,  the following data may be extracted:

A. Sensor MAC address

00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83

B. Sensor Over-all Payload

7C 00 02 00 0E 00 00 00 02 58 00 00 00 00 00 00

C. Delay Value

0x00 0x02 0x58 (data bytes 23, 24, and 25) 
Delay in Seconds = (0x00 x 65536) + (0x02 x 256) + 0x58 = 600 Seconds = 10 Minutes

Set Sensor Node ID and Sleep Duration

This Command may be used to set the sensor node and sleep duration, note that both values are stored together using the same command.  The Node ID is a user-defined value from 00 to FF that may be used to help easily identify a sensor.  The Sleep Duration indicates the amount of time (in seconds) the sensor will sleep before waking up, taking a sample, sending a transmission, and going back to sleep.

Set Node ID and Sleep Duration Command Example:

7E 00 17 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 02 00 00 00 01 00 01 2C CD

In the above command, the remote device address is set to broadcast mode. The broadcast address is 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF, which will target all sensors in configuration mode.  Change the broadcast address to the MAC address of a individual sensor to target a particular sensor with this command (this is usually not required).  The Command Contains a Sensor payload which contains a Sensor Node ID and Delay value.

Payload

F7 02 00 00 00 01 00 01 2C  

Note that F7 is the command header byte and 02 is the sub command for storing the Node ID and Sleep Duration. 

A. Node ID

0x01 (Byte 23)

B. New Delay Value

00 01 2C (data bytes 24, 25, and 26)
Delay in seconds = (0x00 x 65536) + (0x01 x 256) + 0x2C = 300 Seconds = 5 Minutes

In the Above command we set the new node to 1 and sleep duration value to 300 seconds (5 Minutes).

Once the sensor receives this command, it will send a response back. This response will indicate success or failure of the command.

In his case, the response will look something like this:

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C1 7C 01 05 00 0E 00 00 FF 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FD

Read Sensor Network ID

The Network ID is also known as PAN ID (Personal Area Network ID). This feature may be used to build a private Wireless Sensor Network. All sensors with the same Network ID will be able to talk to modems and gateway with the same Network ID.  This is useful when deploying hundreds of sensors in one area or applications which require division of sensors, modems, and gateways into different zones with independent monitoring of each zone.  Each sensor, gateway, and modem in a specific zone should share identical Network IDs, allowing the separation of sensors into smaller, more manageable groups. 

Large factory floors or high-rise building may consist of several groups of sensors working under different Network IDs that help characterize the different areas of the installation.  Network IDs make it easy to group sensors, modems, and gateways.  When broadcasting data using separate Network IDs, multiple modems and gateways may be used in each zone, allowing sensor data to be collected by several different computers or servers.  This kind of redundancy is essential in large installations.

Read Sensor Network ID Command

7E 00 13 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 19 00 00 00 E4

Sensor will respond with the Network ID

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C1 7C 00 05 00 0E 00 00 7F FF 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 7F

From the above response, following data may be extracted:

A. Sensor MAC Address

00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83

B. Complete Sensor Payload

7C 00 05 00 0E 00 00 7F FF 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

C. Network ID

0x07FF (data bytes 23 and 24)

Set Wireless Sensor Network ID

This command may be used to set the sensor Network ID.  Please note, Network ID 0x7BCD is reserved for configuration and should NEVER be used as a network ID for general use.  Please note the Modem/Gateway must also use a matching Network ID to communicate with the sensor.

Set Wireless Sensor Network ID Command:

7E 00 15 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 05 00 00 00 7C DE 9E

Above Command Contains the following payload: 

F7 05 00 00 00 7C DE

Note that F7 is the command header byte and 05 is the sub command for setting the Sensor Network ID. 

In the Above command, a new network ID of 0x7CDE is configured.

Once the sensor receives this command, it will send a response back. This response will contain information regarding command success or failure.

In his case the response was successful, responding with the following frame:

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C1 7C 00 09 00 0E 00 00 FF 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FA

Read Sensor Destination Address

This Command may be used to read the sensor destination address. When the Sensor is in broadcast mode, the destination address will show up as:

0x0000FFFF

This Command may be used to read the sensor destination address.

Read Sensor destination address Command:

7E 00 13 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 18 00 00 00 E5

Sensor will respond with the Stored destination address: 

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C1 7C 00 13 00 0E 00 00 00 00 FF FF 00 00 00 00 00 F1

From the above command, the following data may be extracted:

A. Complete Sensor Payload

7C 00 13 00 0E 00 00 00 00 FF FF 00 00 00 00 00

B. Sensor MAC address

00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83

C. Destination Address

0000FFFF (data bytes 23, 24, 25, and 26)

The sensor response 0000FFFF  indicates that the sensor is in broadcast mode.  Any other value will indicate the sensor is directing its data to a specific address (a specific modem or gateway).  We DO NOT ADVISE sending sensor data to a specific address, we advise broadcasting data using different Network IDs (PAN IDs) to put data into clustered zones.  Should a specific gateway or modem fail while in service, it will be much easier to deploy a new gateway or setup redundant gateways and modems.  Otherwise, reconfiguration of each sensor for a new gateway or modem will be required.

Set Sensor Destination Address

Every sensor is designed to send sensor data either in broadcast mode or to a particular destination address (modem or gateway).  By default, NCD sensors broadcast data to all available modems and gateways.  Data may be restricted to a single destination address (modem or gateway), though this configuration does not provide any form of redundancy in the event of a Modem or Gateway outage.  For this reason, we strongly advise against using this command.  Please consider setting the Network ID (PAN ID) to Setup Zones which will allow for redundancy in the event of a service outage.  The following command is provided for reference ONLY and should be used with caution as a modem or gateway failure will necessitate reconfiguration of each sensor (which would not be required if the Pan ID/Network ID were used).

What is a Destination Address?  Every sensor, gateway, and  modem have a unique MAC address which cannot be changed. This MAC address is also known as the destination address (printed on the side of the enclosure).  By default, all sensors send data in broadcast mode.  This allows all the gateways and modems in the area to receive sensors data provided they are all on the same PAN ID (Network ID) and use the same encryption key.

When a specific destination address is stored in the sensor, the sensor will send data to that specific destination address only.  The sensor CANNOT communicate with any other modem or gateway in the area.  The following command may be used to specify a specific destination address (modem or gateway) for all sensor data: 

Set Destination address Command

This command we will send only the lower 4 bytes of the destination address (the upper 4 bytes do not change). 

7E 00 17 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 03 00 00 00 12 34 56 78 E6

The above Command Contains the payload, including a New Sensor destination address:

Complete Payload

F7 03 00 00 00 12 34 56 78 

F7 is the command header byte and 03 is the sub command for setting a specific destination address.  In this example, the new Destination Address is 12345678.

Once sensor receives this command it will send a response back. This response will indicate the command success or failure.

In his example, the response will look something like this (if successful):

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C1 7C 00 0E 00 0E 00 00 FF 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 F5

Set Sensor Destination to Broadcast

This Command may be used to set the sensor destination address to broadcast mode, which is the default operation of NCD long range wireless sensors.  After setting to broadcast mode, all modems and gateways with the same PAN ID and Encryption key will receive the same sensor data.  This is the preferred configuration for all NCD sensors.  Segmenting sensors into groups requires a unique PAN ID (also known as Network ID) for each group.  All sensors, modems, and gateways must share the same PAN ID for each group.

Set Sensor Destination address to broadcast:

7E 00 13 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 01 00 00 00 FC

Complete Payload

F7 01 00 00 00

 F7 is the command header byte and 01 is the sub-command for setting the Destination Address to Broadcast Mode.

Read Wireless Sensor Transmission Power Level

This Command may be used to read the wireless radio transmission power. This value will indicate how much RF power the radio is emitting. The higher the value, the higher the radiated wireless power, resulting in a longer range and decreased battery life (please note that all battery ratings are shown at maximum wireless transmission power).  Lower values are desirable in application that may benefit from greatly improve battery life, especially when high power data transmissions are not required.

Read Sensor Power Command:

7E 00 13 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 16 00 00 00 E7

Sensor will respond with the Power Level value:

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C1 7C 00 09 00 0E 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 F5

From the above command, the following data may be extracted:

A. Sensor MAC Address

00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83

B. Sensor Payload 

7C 00 09 00 0E 00 00 04 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

C. Power Level

0x04 (data byte 23)

The sensor will respond with a value from 0x00 to 0x04.  The default value is 0x04, allowing for the greatest possible transmission range and the shortest battery life.

Read Wireless Sensor Retries

The following command may be used to read the number of retires.  The number of retries is one of the most useful settings for NCD wireless sensors. 

Lets say the number of retires is set to 5. In a normal case, the sensor will wake up, gather data, send data to the modem, and go back to sleep.  But due to some environmental issues (lets say a few trucks were driving by and they came in between the sensor and the modem) the modem didn’t receive the data. In that case, the sensor will try 4 more times to send the data.  If the modem still doesn’t get the data after all 5 tries, the sensor will quite trying and will go back to sleep.  The sensor will wake up after the predefined sleep time and will try again. 

The highest number of retries allowed is 10.

Read The number of Sensor Retries:

7E 00 13 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 17 00 00 00 E6

Sensor will respond with the Retries value: 

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C1 7C 00 1B 00 0E 00 00 0A 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 DD

From the above command, the following data may be extracted:

A. Sensor MAC Address

00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83

B. Complete Sensor Payload 

7C 00 1B 00 0E 00 00 0A 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

C. Retries Number

0x0A (data byte 23)

Set Wireless Sensor number of Retries

This Command may be used to change the number of retries.  The highest number of retries allowed is 10:

7E 00 14 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F7 06 00 00 00 05 F2

The above Command Contains a Sensor payload which contains a new number of retries value:

Complete Payload

F7 06 00 00 00 05 

F7 is the command header byte and 06 is the sub command for setting the Retries value.

In the Above command we set the retries value to 5 (byte 23).

Once the sensor receives this command, it will send a response back. This response will contain the info regarding command success or failure.

In his case the response was successful:

7E 00 1C 90 00 13 A2 00 41 91 1B 83 FF FE C1 7C 00 1D 00 0E 00 00 FF 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 E6

Set Wireless Sensor Encryption Key

This Command may be used to set the encryption key. 

All ncd.io wireless sensors comes with 128bit AES encryption. The default encryption key secures a wireless sensor network of sensors, modems, and gateways.  Users have the option to change the default encryption key.  Please note this is a Write ONLY operation, it is not possible to read the encryption key from Sensors, Modems, or Gateways.  Be Sure to keep records accordingly.

Once the sensor encryption key is set in the sensor, be sure to set the same key in all modems and gateways.  If the modem or gateway doesn’t have the same key and PAN id as the sensor, there will be no way for sensors to communicate with modems or gateways.  In this event, only a factory reset may be used to recover communications.

The following Command may be used to change the encryption key:

7E 00 24 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF FF FE 00 00 F2 03 00 00 00 00 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 07

Complete Payload

F2 03 00 00 00 00 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA

F2 is the command header byte and 03 is the sub command for setting the ENY Key value.

Note — There is an Extra 0x00 Right before the ENY key value. Its a reserve byte and it should be there all the time. 

In the Above command, the default ENY Key value is programmed into the NCD sensor.

55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA

Once the sensor receives this command, it will change the Key immediately. 

In the event a key value is lost, factory reset the device.  The default key value will always be used after factory reset:

55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA 55 AA

Configuration Commands Table

No.CommandHeaderSub CommandParameter FieldDefault ValueDescription
1Set Broadcast Transmission 0XF70x010000FFFFThis will set the address to Broadcast mode. All the receiver with same ENY key and PAN ID will get the data packets
2Set ID and Sleep Interval0XF70x02NODE ID, D0 MSB,D1, D2 LSB0x00,0x00,0x02,0x58Sets the Device node ID and Data Transmission Interval. The node id value can go from 0-255 and The Data transmission value can go from 3-0xFFFFFF Seconds
3Set Destination Address0XF70x03A0 MSB, A1, A2, A300,00,FF,FFSets the Destination Address of the sensor. The sensor will send Run mode Data packets to this Address
4Set Power0XF70x04Power ( range 1-4)0x04Sets the RF power of the Sensor Radio
5Set PAN ID aka Network ID0XF70x05ID0 MSB, ID1 LSB 0x7FFFSets the PAN ID aka Network ID in the sensor. Only sensors, Gateway, and Modes with Same ID can communicate with each other
6Set Retries 0XF70x06Retries0x0ASets the number of Retries after unsuccessful transmission for the Sensor Radio
7Read Sleep Interval0XF70x150x00,0x02,0x58Reads the stored Sleep Interval value from the sensor
8Read Power0XF70x160x04Reads the stored RF Power value from the sensor
9Read Retries0XF70x170x0AReads the stored Retries value from the sensor
10Read Destination Address0XF70x1800,00,FF,FFReads the stored Destination value from the sensor
11Read PAN ID aka Network ID0XF70x190x7FFFReads the PAN ID aka Network ID
12Enable Encryption 0XF20x010x01Enables the Encryption of the Frame Transmitted from the Sensor
13Disable Encryption 0XF20x02Disables the Encryption of the Frame Transmitted from the Sensor
14Set Encryption Key0XF20x0300,K0 MSB, K1,K2,K3,K4,K5,K6,K7,K8,K9,K10,K11,K12,K13,K14,K1555AA55AA55AA55AA55AA55AA55AA55AASets the 128 bit AES Encryption Key

Sensor App Specific Configuration Commands Table

COMMANDCOMMANDSUB COMMANDCOMMAND CODEARGUMENT
SET OUTPUT DATA RATEF44F0x00100sps (Range 1.56 – 25 Hz) 0x07
200sps (Range 3.125 – 50 Hz) 0x08
400sps (Range 6.25 – 100 Hz) 0x09
800sps (Range 12.5 – 200 Hz) 0x0A
1600sps (Range 25 – 400 Hz) 0x0B
3200sps (Range 50 – 800 Hz) 0x0C
6400sps (Range 100 – 1600 Hz) 0x0D
12800sps (Range 200 – 3200 Hz) 0x0E
25600sps (Range 400 – 6400 Hz) 0x0F
GET OUTPUT DATA RATE F44F0x01100sps (Range 1.56 – 25 Hz) 0x07
200sps (Range 3.125 – 50 Hz) 0x08
400sps (Range 6.25 – 100 Hz) 0x09
800sps (Range 12.5 – 200 Hz) 0x0A
1600sps (Range 25 – 400 Hz) 0x0B
3200sps (Range 50 – 800 Hz) 0x0C
6400sps (Range 100 – 1600 Hz) 0x0D
12800sps (Range 200 – 3200 Hz) 0x0E
25600sps (Range 400 – 6400 Hz) 0x0F
SET SAMPLING DURATIONF44F0x02Period of samples in seconds
must be > 0
Sample duration value is multiple of 50mS i.e. setting sample duration to 1 will set the duration time to 50mSec, setting duration to 2 will set sample duration time to 100msec and so on
GET SAMPLING DURATIONF44F0x03
SET AXES ENABLEF44F0x04Bit 0 —> X-axis
Bit 1 —> Y-axis
Bit 2 —> Z-axis

Bit Set – Axis enabled
Bit Cleared – Axis disabled
GET AXES ENABLEF44F0x05
SET SAMPLING INTERVALF44F0x06Every 5 minutes 0x0
Every 10 minutes 0x01
Every 15 minutes 0x02
Every 20 minutes 0x03
Every 30 minutes 0x04
Every 60 minutes 0x05
Every 120 minutes 0x06
GET SAMPLING INTERVALF44F0x07
SET RTCF44F0x08Byte 1 : Hours
Byte 2 : Minutes
Byte 3 : Seconds
SET OPERATION MODEF44F0x090x00 — Processed Mode
0x01 — Raw mode
0x02 — Processed +Raw on Request
GET OPERATION MODEF44F0x0A
SET FULL-SCALE RANGEF44F0x0B+/- 2g 0x00
+/- 4g 0x01
+/- 8g 0x02
+/- 16g 0x03
GET FULL-SCALE RANGEF44F0x0C+/- 2g 0x00
+/- 4g 0x01
+/- 8g 0x02
+/- 16g 0x03
SET FILTERSF44F0x0D0x01 — Enable
0x00 — Disable
Get FILTERSF44F0x0E
Set Measurement Mode oneF44F0x0F0x00 — Device will send processed data, acc in mg, velocity in mm/sec and displacement in mm

0x01 — Device will send processed data, acc in ms^2, velocity in inch/sec and displacement in milli
Get Measurement ModeF44F0x10
Set On Request TimeoutF44F0x11Value Range — 0-20sec. Device will decide how long device will stay awake and wait for raw time domain request from command
Get On Request TimeoutF44F0x12
Set Dead band Value in mgF44F0x29Value Range — 0-255mg. default value is 35mg. Sensor will not consider acc values below dead band values as noise
Get Dead band Value in mgF44F0x29

Installation Guidelines

7

Vibration Sensor installation is extremally critical step, in order to insure the best results sensor mounting guidelines should be followed. 

A. Sensor Main Body Mount — The sensor main body comes with 4 magnets. These magnets makes it easy to mount. During mounting make sure

  1. Sensor is Powered on ( the switch should be positioned towards the wall of the enclosure if using battery and on other side if using with external power)
  2. Antenna is installed and pointed vertically to the ground
  3. Install the main sensor box as high as possible to avoid any object which might come in between the sensor and modem/gateway
  4. Antenna should not be installed inside any metal box

B. Sensor Probe — This is the part which measures vibration. There are three mounting options. if magnets are being used to mount the sensor 

  1. Magnet should be flat to the surface
  2. Remove any oil, pain, dirt between sensor Magnet and installation surface
  3. Sensor can be installed in any position, while installing make sure cables are properly managed and there i no stress on the sensor. 

 

 

Troubleshooting Guide

8

ncd vibration sensor V3 can be used with any ncd modems and gateway and from there data can be pushed to any cloud or local server. 

If there is no data on the gateway side, here are few things users can check

  1. Sensor is powered on
  2. Batteries are in good condition ( Leaving the sensor in cfg mode for a long time will drain batteries)
  3. Antenna is connected and pig tail is secured
  4. Press the reset button and sensor will send a welcome message followed by a sensor data packet. 
  5. Check the LED status. if the LED is blinking as expected, means sensor is working

On the Receiver side — 

  1. If you are using a modem make sure correct port settings are selected
  2. Sensor radio module and Modem/gateway radio module are of same frequency
  3. Gateway is connected to WiFi
  4. Gateway and Sensor are atleast 3 feet apart

 

 

Sensor Support Map

9

SensorSensor Type Product SKU Alpha StationAWS GatewayAzure GatewayLosant GatewayMQTT GatewayNode RedLabViewPython
Temperature Humidity Sensor1PR49-24AYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Push Notification 2-Channel2PR52-3DYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
ADC Converter 2-Channel3PR52-1YesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Thermocouple 1-Channel4PR52-2YesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Gyro Magneto Acellero5PR49-24DYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless Pressure Sensor6PR49-24HYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Acceleration and Impact Detection7PR49-24KYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless Vibration Sensor8PR49-24EYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless Proximity Sensor9PR49-24BYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless Ambient Light Sensor10PR49-24CYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
In Development - Wireless Color Sensor11
Wireless 3 Channel Thermocouple Sensor12PR55-19BYesYesYesYesYesUntestedYes
Wireless 1 Channel AC Current Sensor13PR52-7YesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless 1 Channel 4-20mA Receiver14PR52-9YesYesYesYesYesUntestedYes
Wireless 1 Channel 0-10V Receiver15PR52-10YesYesYesYesYesUntestedYes
Wireless 1 Channel Soil Moisture Sensor16PR55-2BYesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntested
Wireless 1 Channel AC Voltage Sensor17PR52-13YesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedYes
Wireless 1 Channel Frequency/Pulse Sensor18PR52-14YesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedYes
Wireless 2 Channel Current Sensor19PR55-4BYesYesYesYesYesUntestedYes
Wireless High Precision Pressure Sensor20PR55-24YesYesYesYesYesUntestedYes
Wireless Differential Bi directional Pressure Sensor21PR49-24MYesYesYesYesYesUntestedYes
Wireless 0-24V AC/DC Optically Isolated Inputs22PR52-12YesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedYes
Wireless 2 Channel Thermocouple Sensor23PR55-19AYesYesYesYesYesUntestedYes
Wireless Activity detection sensor24PR49-24JYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless Asset Monitor sensor25PR49-24IYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless Pressure Sensor26PR52-33PYesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntested
Wireless Environmental Sensor27PR49-24LYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless 3 Channel Current Sensor28PR55-26CYesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntested
Wireless Linear Displacement Sensor29PR55-2EYesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntested
Wireless Structural Monitoring Sensor30PR55-2FYesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntested
Air Quality TVOC eCO2 Temperature and Humidity Sensor31PR49-24GYes
Particulate Matter Sensor32PR52-33MYes
Wireless AC Current Detect Sensor33PR52-45Yes
Wireless Tank Level34Yes
Wireless 1 Channel Counter35PR52-3BYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless 2 Channel Counter36PR52-3CYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
Wireless 7 Push Notification37PR52-18YesYesYesYesYesYesYes
In Development38
Wireless 3 Wire RTD Temperature Sensor39PR52-27YesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntested
Wireless Enterprise Vibration Sensor**40PR52-33NYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
RPM Proximity Sensor41YesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedYesYes
Wireless 0-24VDC Voltage Monitor42PR52-10AYes
Wireless Dual Temperature Humidity Current Detection Sensor43PR55-41AYes
Wireless CO2 Gas Sensor44PR52-46Yes
4-20mA 16-Bit Input Transmitter45PR55-5AYes
Motion Detection Sensor46PR52-48Yes
Wireless Tilt Sensor47PR52-33_TS
4-20mA 16-Bit Input Transmitter48PT55-48Yes - Untested
Wireless 6 Channel Thermocouple Sensor49PR55-47_6TC
Predictive Maintenance Sensor50PR55-20AYesUntestedUntestedUntestedUntestedUntested
6 Channel Current Sensor51PR55-47_6C
Yes - Untested
Wireless 2 Channel 4-20mA Receiver 52PR55-47_2CRYes - Untested
Wireless Air Quality CO2 and PM Sensor53PR55-59_THPCYes - Untested
Wireless 2 Channel RTD54PR55-47_2RTDYes - Untested
Wireless 3 Channel RTD55PR55-47_3RTD
Wireless 2 Channel 0-10VDC Receiver 56PR55-47_2DCYes - Untested
Wireless Air Flow/Velocity Sensor60PR55-24V
Wireless pH Temperature Sensor61PR55-47pHYes
Wireless ORP Temperature Sensor62PR55-47ORPYes - Untested
Wireless pH and ORPTemperature Sensor63PR55-47pHORPYes
Wireless EC Sensor64PR55-47ECYes
Wireless DO Sensor65PR55-47DOYes - Needs Parser Review
Wireless EC and DO Sensor66PR55-47EC_DOYes - Needs Parser Review
Wireless PAR Sensor67PR55-57PARYes
Wireless 2 Channel Soil Moisture Sensor68PR55-2C
Wireless 1 Channel Soil Temp Moisture and EC Sensor69PR55-57_SLA
Wireless 2 Channel Soil Temp Moisture and EC Sensor70PR55-65_SLB
Wireless 3 Channel Soil Temp Moisture and EC Sensor71PR55-65_SLC
Wireless Enterprise Vibration Sensor V380PR55-61EYes
Wireless Enterprise Dual Vibration Sensor V381Yes - Untested
Predictive Maintenance V2 Sensor82Yes - Untested
C_50-27502
C_Current_1C505Yes - Untested
C_Current_3C506Yes - Untested
SensorSensor Type Product SKU Alpha StationAWS GatewayAzure GatewayLosant GatewayMQTT GatewayNode RedLabViewPython