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Introduction

The Fusion® Series is our fourth generation relay controller offering the ultimate relay control solution . . . without exception.

Reactor enables a Fusion Series relay controller to control relays based on sensor inputs.  Reactor has the ability to read sensors connected directly to a Fusion controller or to wireless remote Fusion controllers linked using our Remote Access wireless communication technology.  This allows Fusion controllers to share sensors with each other in a wireless group.  Reactor allows you to mix local and wireless remote sensors together in any combination.

Reactor is capable of monitoring up to 16 different sensors, with special provisions for analog and digital sensor data.  Reactor also includes 16 counters, used for controlling relay sequences, as well as 16 timers.  Reactor is capable of controlling the first 32 relays of a Fusion controller.  Additional relays may be controlled using Taralist (time schedule) or ProXR (computer control).

Reactor has a preset list of events available.  When sensor values match user-defined settings, events are triggered.  Events allow you to control relays, flash relays, trigger/reset timers, increase/decrease counters, send/push notifications to a server, and much more.

The capabilities of the Reactor processor are greatly expanded when the TLEE expansion module is plugged into the Fusion controller.  The TLEE expansion module provides additional memory as well as Real Time Clock, allowing the Fusion controller to control relays based on a time schedule.  With the TLEE expansion module installed, users will have many more ways to trigger events.  For example, analog sensors will be capable of handling up to 7 limits per sensor with 32 total events per sensor.  Without the TLEE, analog sensors are limited to 2 limits per sensor and 12 events.  Push notifications are possible for users with the TLEE expansion module installed.

Remote Access features allow a Fusion controller to ask other Fusion controllers for sensor data using wireless communications.  A TLEE expansion module is required for a Fusion controller to ask another Fusion controller for data.  However, a Fusion controller is capable of responding to requests for sensor data without a TLEE expansion module.  Put simply, a TLEE is required in applications where the Fusion controller acts as a master (requesting sensor data), but the TLEE is not required when Fusion is acting as a slave (responding to sensor data requests).

Reactor also includes a method of associating relays to Timers and Counters.  This allows relays to follow the sequence of a counter (with many counting sequence types available).  Relays may also be associated with timers, activating or deactivating as timers reach various states.  Timer and counters may be combined, allowing relays to be progressively switched as time increases (perfect for runway or driveway light applications).

Since Fusion controllers have three separate relay controllers integrated into the firmware (Reactor, Taralist, and ProXR), these three controllers require a clearly defined strategy for managing relay priorities.  Without it, relay state changes would be unpredictable.  Fusion controllers have a very powerful and flexible relay priority system that is color coded when using our Base Station software, making it easy to see which controller has control of the relay.

By default, Reactor relay control has priority over a Taralist relay (time schedule relay), and has a lower priority than a ProXR Relay (computer controlled relay).  However, Taralist and Reactor can control a relay cooperatively.  Using cooperative relay control you can tie a sensor to a time schedule.  The relay priority system can be configured so that both Taralist and Reactor must tell the same relay to turn on before the relay will activate.  The cooperative state of the relay may also be changed so that either Taralist OR Reactor can activate the same relay.  However, the default cooperative state of the relay is for Reactor to take control and override a Taralist relay, and when this happens, Taralist will be unable to control a Reactor relay.  ProXR (computer control) always has top priority over Taralist and Reactor, allowing users to override sensor and time scheduled relay control. 

Reactor is configured using Base Station Software.  Base Station is capable of communicating and configuring a Fusion controller using any supported communication technology.  Fusion controllers equipped with Wi-Fi, Ethernet or Web-i interface may be configured remotely over the internet provided port forwarding is properly configured on your router.  A static IP address is not required for remote configuration.

The WiNet Gateway may also be used to configure and speak to Fusion controllers over the internet.  Base Station software can be used to talk to the WiNet Gateway over the internet, and the WiNet Gateway can talk to 802.15.4 wireless Fusion controllers as well as Fusion controllers equipped with a Wi-Fi, Ethernet, and Web-i interface.  The WiNet Gateway also allows you to use web pages to access and control Fusion devices.  The WiNet Gateway is constantly in development, and will eventually include web page configuration of Fusion controllers as well as support for ZigBee Mesh communications.

Base Station software also includes provisions for uploading and downloading configuration settings.  This is very useful if you need to make periodic changes to a controller, or if you need multiple controllers to operate with the same configuration.

There are five steps to setting up a Reactor controller.  These steps should be loosely followed in order, though it is not required.  If you intend to access sensors on wireless remote Fusion controllers, Step 1 should be completed first, as the settings in Step 1 will affect options that are available in Step 2.  Some users may find most configuration can be completed in just one or two steps.

Here, we will provide an overview of each step so that you will know what to expect.

Step 1:  Remote Device Setup

Remote Device Setup is used to tell Fusion controllers about other 802.15.4 wireless Fusion controllers in the area.  This allows Fusion controllers to ask other Fusion controllers for sensor data.  This control panel allows you to store the serial number of other controllers.  This control panel also includes an option to “Build a Tunnel to Remote Device.”  This option gathers important information about the remote device and stores it in the Fusion controller so that Base Station software can provide configuration settings that are appropriate for the remote device.  Fusion is capable of speaking to 256 remote devices, so there are many pages of configuration available for Remote Device Setup.  Remote Device Setup requires a TLEE expansion module.

Step 2:  Data Collector

Data Collector is used to “Feed” data from a sensor into the Reactor Processing engine where it can be evaluated and events can be triggered.  Data Collector allows you to feed digital and analog sensor data into the Reactor engine and evaluate each type of data appropriately.  Data Collector will capture data from a sensor connected directly to the Fusion controller.  If you have a TLEE installed and have completed Step 1, Data Collector will be able to use our Remote Access technology to gather data from a remotely located Fusion controller using 802.15.4 wireless communications.  Data Collector also allows you to define various types of triggers and limits for both analog and digital sensors.

Step 3:  Counter Configuration

Reactor is capable of counting.  While this may not sound too exciting, it is actually one of the most powerful features of a Fusion controller.  What makes counting so special is patterns.  Patterns are attached to counters, changing the pattern as the counter increases or decreases.  One of 24 preset patterns may be used to control the sequence of relays and how they are activated.  When patterns are “mapped” to relays, relays can activate in the same pattern.  Increasing the counter can turn lights on in sequence for driveway applications.  Increasing a different counter can be used to flash lights in a different pattern to indicate an emergency condition.  Patterns add an enormous amount of flexibility to a Fusion counter.  It is definitely worth your time to learn how to use counters, as they allow relays to be activated in complex sequences.  Counters are not affected by the TLEE expansion module.

Step 4:  Timers

Reactor controllers have 16 user-configured timers available.  Timers allow a relay to activate for a specified period of time.  Timers can be activated or cancelled according to various sensor conditions.  Timers also have the ability to trigger events every second or at the beginning or end of a timer.  The TLEE expansion module greatly increases the number of timer events that are possible.

Step 5:  Relay Connector

Relay Connector is used to attach relays to timers and counters.  Relay Connector is a simple configuration control panel that binds up to 32 relays to timers and counters that have been configured in Steps 3 and 4.  The Relay Connector control panel is not affected by the TLEE expansion module.

Overview

The Overview control panel allows you watch Reactor as timers and counters are triggered.  You can also watch sensor values and relay state changes.  It is also possible to trigger/cancel timers as well as increase/decrease counters.  The Overview control panel should be considered a summary page that can help you see how Reactor is working to make decisions to control relays.

Push Notification

The Push Notification control panel is used to configure Push Notification options.  Push notifications may be sent according to a time schedule (using Taralist), according to sensor changes (using Reactor), or according to a computer request.  A push notification may include important sensor and relay status information.  A server or a computer can pick up these notifications to trigger text messages and email alerts when sensors exceed preset limits or when important events are detected by Reactor.  The Push Notification control panel clearly explains each byte in a Push Notification data packet.  A TLEE expansion module is required for this option as these settings must be stored in external memory.

Getting Started

Now that you have had an overview of what Reactor is capable of doing, follow this guide to configure Reactor for your own sensor controlled relay applications.  In this guide, we will discuss all configuration screens and set up a few applications to help you get a feel for how Reactor uses your settings to make decisions.  As you work with Base Station software, you will notice that Reactor settings update in the controller as you make changes to your configuration.  We wanted to give users a completely interactive experience to minimize configuration time.  When you have Reactor configured the way you want, you can download your configuration file for use in other controllers.

Just in Case . . .

We have tested Reactor configuration extensively, but it is not possible for us to test all combinations of settings.  If for any reason your configuration causes the Fusion controller to lock up or become unresponsive to Base Station software, power down the Fusion controller.  Move the Program/Run Jumper to the Program position.  Power up the Fusion controller and run Base Station software again.  Download your configuration from the controller and send it to us so we can patch the firmware or Base Station software.  The Fusion controller will NOT execute Reactor or Taralist events when powered up in Program mode as a safety precaution.  However, you may edit your settings in Program mode to help get your controller up and going again.  To resume normal Reactor function, power up the Fusion controller in Run mode.

Base Station Software

To begin configuring Reactor capabilities built into your Fusion controller, run Base Station software.  Base Station software is available from the following link: ncd.io/start

If communication is properly configured, Base Station will display the window shown on the following page.  If you experience any problems, please review the Quick Start Guide that applies to your communication technology for troubleshooting information. 

Configuration

After communication is configured, Base Station will display the window shown below. 

From this window, select the option for the “Reactor Generation II Automatic Relay Controller” feature.

The window below shows the main Reactor configuration window.  We will loosely follow configuration in the steps shown.

Note the expansion module is required for some of the options shown above.

Step 1:  Remote Device Setup

Remote Device Setup is a feature of our Remote Access technology.  The Remote Access Quick Start Guide contains detailed instructions for Remote Device Setup.  Remote Access cannot be configured unless the following criteria are met:

  1. A TLEE expansion module is required and must be properly installed in your Fusion controller.  The TLEE expansion module is available from ncd.io.
  2. A Digi 802.15.4 wireless communication module must be configured for 115.2K Baud and set to API mode using X-CTU software from www.Digi.com.  Customers who have purchased the Remote Access option or have purchased a Remote Access 802.15.4 communications module from NCD do not need to use X-CTU software for configuration as your controller or module comes pre-configured.
  3. Write down the serial number of your 802.15.4 communications module and keep it in a log book.  This is VERY IMPORTANT for using the Remote Access technology.  Your log book should also include the location of installation for easy reference as you will need this information as you add Remote Access devices to your installation.  The serial number of the 802.15.4 communications module is printed on the bottom of the module.
  4. The 802.15.4 Communications Module must be installed in Port 2 of the Fusion controller.  Port 2 is the Remote Access Port, which allows Fusion controllers to communicate with each other.
  5. Port 2 of the Fusion controller MUST be configured for Remote Access using the Device Configuration control panel.  Simply set the UART Communication Technology setting to 802.15.4 Remote Access.

Please refer to the Remote Access Quick Start Guide for further configuration information of Remote Access features.

Step 2: Data Collector

Data Collector is used to gather sensor data from various sources and place all these data into a single location where it can be monitored.  This screen defines which sensors Reactor is monitoring.  Reactor is capable of monitoring up to 16 sensors simultaneously.  Sensor values may not be shown until the sensor is activated using the “Set Sensor Limits and Events” button.

 

Data Collector without the TLEE expansion module.

If the TLEE expansion module is installed, Data Collector will have a few more configuration options for Remote or Local Sensors as well as Remote Sensor Timeout.

Data Collector with the TLEE expansion module.

Remote Sensor Timeout

In applications where a Fusion controller is asking another Fusion controller for sensor data, it may become necessary to use a timeout in the event a remote sensor does not respond with data.  Data Collector has an option to set the Remote Sensor Timeout to a value of 0 to 255.  Remote Sensor Timeout sets the number of seconds until the sensor value is automatically cleared to 0 in the event sensor data is not received from a remote Fusion controller.  A value of 0 turns off Remote Sensor Timeout. 

Set Sensor Limits and Events:  Introduction

Sensor Limits and Events define how a Reactor controller will react to sensor data.  Depending on the type of data source you have chosen, the “Set Sensor Limits and Events” button will show different windows.  For instance, if you have chosen an analog data source, you can set limits for sensor values.  If you choose digital data sources, event triggers are based on bit changes rather than analog value changes.  Focusing configuration on the type Reactor is handling makes it easier to understand how Reactor is making decisions.  The presence of a TLEE expansion module will greatly affect the options available when clicking the “Set Sensor Limits and Events” button.  Adding the TLEE expansion module will greatly increase the number of ways events may be triggered. 

Event List

The Event List is the list of potential events a Reactor controller is capable of processing.  When these events are triggered, the Reactor controller will carry out the function indicated in the Event List.  The Event List for the Reactor Generation II is shown below:

Event 0        Do Nothing: Reactor ignores the “Do Nothing” event.  When a user needs to turn off a particular event, the “Do Nothing” event should be selected.

Event 1        Increase Counter 1

Event 2        Increase Counter 2

Event 3        Increase Counter 3

Event 4        Increase Counter 4

Event 5        Increase Counter 5

Event 6        Increase Counter 6

Event 7        Increase Counter 7

Event 8        Increase Counter 8

Event 9        Increase Counter 9

Event 10      Increase Counter 10

Event 11      Increase Counter 11

Event 12      Increase Counter 12

Event 13      Increase Counter 13

Event 14      Increase Counter 14

Event 15      Increase Counter 15

Event 16      Increase Counter 16

Event 17      Decrease Counter 1

Event 18      Decrease Counter 2

Event 19      Decrease Counter 3

Event 20      Decrease Counter 4

Event 21      Decrease Counter 5

Event 22      Decrease Counter 6

Event 23      Decrease Counter 7

Event 24      Decrease Counter 8

Event 25      Decrease Counter 9

Event 26      Decrease Counter 10

Event 27      Decrease Counter 11

Event 28      Decrease Counter 12

Event 29      Decrease Counter 13

Event 30      Decrease Counter 14

Event 31      Decrease Counter 15

Event 32      Decrease Counter 16

The Increase/Decrease Counter Events are often used to make groups of relays count in preset sequences.  Use counters for driveway lights or sequence rotations between light groups with a single light switch.  Counters are an easy way to allow a Reactor controller to change the state of a group of relays.

Event 33      Reset Counter 1

Event 34      Reset Counter 2

Event 35      Reset Counter 3

Event 36      Reset Counter 4

Event 37      Reset Counter 5

Event 38      Reset Counter 6

Event 39      Reset Counter 7

Event 40      Reset Counter 8

Event 41      Reset Counter 9

Event 42      Reset Counter 10

Event 43      Reset Counter 11

Event 44      Reset Counter 12

Event 45      Reset Counter 13

Event 46      Reset Counter 14

Event 47      Reset Counter 15

Event 48      Reset Counter 16

Resetting a Counter returns a Counter to its lowest value.

Event 49      Trigger Timer 1

Event 50      Trigger Timer 2

Event 51      Trigger Timer 3

Event 52      Trigger Timer 4

Event 53      Trigger Timer 5

Event 54      Trigger Timer 6

Event 55      Trigger Timer 7

Event 56      Trigger Timer 8

Event 57      Trigger Timer 9

Event 58      Trigger Timer 10

Event 59      Trigger Timer 11

Event 60      Trigger Timer 12

Event 61      Trigger Timer 13

Event 62      Trigger Timer 14

Event 63      Trigger Timer 15

Event 64      Trigger Timer 16

When a timer is triggered, the user-defined time period is loaded into the timer, and the timer begins counting down to zero.  When Zero is reached, the timer has “Expired.”

Event 65      Cancel Timer 1

Event 66      Cancel Timer 2

Event 67      Cancel Timer 3

Event 68      Cancel Timer 4

Event 69      Cancel Timer 5

Event 70      Cancel Timer 6

Event 71      Cancel Timer 7

Event 72      Cancel Timer 8

Event 73      Cancel Timer 9

Event 74      Cancel Timer 10

Event 75      Cancel Timer 11

Event 76      Cancel Timer 12

Event 77      Cancel Timer 13

Event 78      Cancel Timer 14

Event 79      Cancel Timer 15

Event 80      Cancel Timer 16

The Cancel Timer Event stops the countdown of the selected timer.

Event 81      Turn On Relay 1

Event 82      Turn On Relay 2

Event 83      Turn On Relay 3

Event 84      Turn On Relay 4

Event 85      Turn On Relay 5

Event 86      Turn On Relay 6

Event 87      Turn On Relay 7

Event 88      Turn On Relay 8

Event 89      Turn On Relay 9

Event 90      Turn On Relay 10

Event 91      Turn On Relay 11

Event 92      Turn On Relay 12

Event 93      Turn On Relay 13

Event 94      Turn On Relay 14

Event 95      Turn On Relay 15

Event 96      Turn On Relay 16

Event 97      Turn On Relay 17

Event 98      Turn On Relay 18

Event 99      Turn On Relay 19

Event 100      Turn On Relay 20

Event 101      Turn On Relay 21

Event 102      Turn On Relay 22

Event 103      Turn On Relay 23

Event 104      Turn On Relay 24

Event 105      Turn On Relay 25

Event 106      Turn On Relay 26

Event 107      Turn On Relay 27

Event 108      Turn On Relay 28

Event 109      Turn On Relay 29

Event 110      Turn On Relay 30

Event 111      Turn On Relay 31

Event 112      Turn On Relay 32

Event 113      Turn Off Relay 1

Event 114      Turn Off Relay 2

Event 115      Turn Off Relay 3

Event 116      Turn Off Relay 4

Event 117      Turn Off Relay 5

Event 118      Turn Off Relay 6

Event 119      Turn Off Relay 7

Event 120      Turn Off Relay 8

Event 121      Turn Off Relay 9

Event 122      Turn Off Relay 10

Event 123      Turn Off Relay 11

Event 124      Turn Off Relay 12

Event 125      Turn Off Relay 13

Event 126      Turn Off Relay 14

Event 127      Turn Off Relay 15

Event 128      Turn Off Relay 16

Event 129      Turn Off Relay 17

Event 130      Turn Off Relay 18

Event 131      Turn Off Relay 19

Event 132      Turn Off Relay 20

Event 133      Turn Off Relay 21

Event 134      Turn Off Relay 22

Event 135      Turn Off Relay 23

Event 136      Turn Off Relay 24

Event 137      Turn Off Relay 25

Event 138      Turn Off Relay 26

Event 139      Turn Off Relay 27

Event 140      Turn Off Relay 28

Event 141      Turn Off Relay 29

Event 142      Turn Off Relay 30

Event 143      Turn Off Relay 31

Event 144      Turn Off Relay 32

Reactor is capable of controlling the first 32 relays on a Fusion controller.

Event 145      Toggle the State of Relay 1

Event 146      Toggle the State of Relay 2

Event 147      Toggle the State of Relay 3

Event 148      Toggle the State of Relay 4

Event 149      Toggle the State of Relay 5

Event 150      Toggle the State of Relay 6

Event 151      Toggle the State of Relay 7

Event 152      Toggle the State of Relay 8

Event 153      Toggle the State of Relay 9

Event 154      Toggle the State of Relay 10

Event 155      Toggle the State of Relay 11

Event 156      Toggle the State of Relay 12

Event 157      Toggle the State of Relay 13

Event 158      Toggle the State of Relay 14

Event 159      Toggle the State of Relay 15

Event 160      Toggle the State of Relay 16

Event 161      Toggle the State of Relay 17

Event 162      Toggle the State of Relay 18

Event 163      Toggle the State of Relay 19

Event 164      Toggle the State of Relay 20

Event 165      Toggle the State of Relay 21

Event 166      Toggle the State of Relay 22

Event 167      Toggle the State of Relay 23

Event 168      Toggle the State of Relay 24

Event 169      Toggle the State of Relay 25

Event 170      Toggle the State of Relay 26

Event 171      Toggle the State of Relay 27

Event 172      Toggle the State of Relay 28

Event 173      Toggle the State of Relay 29

Event 174      Toggle the State of Relay 30

Event 175      Toggle the State of Relay 31

Event 176      Toggle the State of Relay 32

The first 32 relays of a Fusion controller may be toggled.  Toggling a relay changes a relay to the opposite of its current state.  If the relay is off, the relay will be toggled on.  If the relay is on, the relay will be toggled off

Event 177      Flash Relay 1

Event 178      Flash Relay 2

Event 179      Flash Relay 3

Event 180      Flash Relay 4

Event 181      Flash Relay 5

Event 182      Flash Relay 6

Event 183      Flash Relay 7

Event 184      Flash Relay 8

Event 185      Flash Relay 9

Event 186      Flash Relay 10

Event 187      Flash Relay 11

Event 188      Flash Relay 12

Event 189      Flash Relay 13

Event 190      Flash Relay 14

Event 191      Flash Relay 15

Event 192      Flash Relay 16

Event 193      Cancel Flash Relay 1

Event 194      Cancel Flash Relay 2

Event 195      Cancel Flash Relay 3

Event 196      Cancel Flash Relay 4

Event 197      Cancel Flash Relay 5

Event 198      Cancel Flash Relay 6

Event 199      Cancel Flash Relay 7

Event 200      Cancel Flash Relay 8

Event 201      Cancel Flash Relay 9

Event 202      Cancel Flash Relay 10

Event 203      Cancel Flash Relay 11

Event 204      Cancel Flash Relay 12

Event 205      Cancel Flash Relay 13

Event 206      Cancel Flash Relay 14

Event 207      Cancel Flash Relay 15

Event 208      Cancel Flash Relay 16

The first 16 relays of a Fusion controller may be set to flash on and off in the background.  Flashing may be triggered or cancelled using these Reactor events.  The Flash Relay event is actually a ProXR Feature; Reactor simply has the ability to activate or deactivate this feature.  ProXR relays are color-coded green when using Base Station software.  Though a Flash event was triggered from Reactor, the relay will change state to green when it is flashed because ProXR “owns” the flashing function.

Event 209      Turn Off All Relays in Bank 1

Event 210      Turn Off All Relays in Bank 2

Event 211      Turn Off All Relays in Bank 3

Event 212      Turn Off All Relays in Bank 4

Event 213      Turn On All Relays in Bank 1

Event 214      Turn On All Relays in Bank 2

Event 215      Turn On All Relays in Bank 3

Event 216      Turn On All Relays in Bank 4

A Bank of Relays is a group of 8 relays.  Bank 1 refers to relays 1-8, Bank 2 refers to relays 9-16,  Bank 3 refers to relays 17-24, and Bank 4 refers to relays 25-32.  These events simply activate or deactivate all relays in the specified bank.

Event 217      Increase Lifetime Counter 1

Event 218      Increase Lifetime Counter 2

Event 219      Increase Lifetime Counter 3

Event 220      Increase Lifetime Counter 4

A Lifetime Counter is used to help keep track of the mechanical life of a device.  Lifetime Counters are automatically backed up by the Fusion controller every 2 hours.  A Lifetime counter is a 32-Bit counter.  A practical example would be a garage door.  These events can be triggered every time a garage door opens so you have an idea of how many times the garage door mechanism has cycled.  Lifetime counters may be used for any type of mechanical device to help gauge how long the device has been used versus how long it is expected to last.

Event 221      Send Push Notification

A Push Notification sends a message to a server, indicating the current status of sensors and relays.  Push notifications may be sent on a regular daily schedule using Taralist (time activated) features, or when a sensor goes outside a preset limit.  Push notifications may be analyzed by a server, and text messages or email notifications may be sent indicating a condition that may require attention.

Event 222      Halt Taralist Processing

Event 223      Resume Taralist Processing

Taralist processing is a background feature of a Fusion controller equipped with a TLEE expansion module.  Taralist processes relay on/off control functions and Reactor events based on a regular time schedule.  This event is used to halt or resume time schedule processing.

Event 224      Clear Reactor Relays and Priorities

This event changes the priority status of all relays, removing Reactor control so that Taralist (time schedule) is allowed to handle relay control operations.  Taralist has lower priority than Reactor, so removing Reactor control from the relays will allow Taralist to control relays.  However, if a relay is under ProXR control (computer control), this function will not appear to have any effect, as ProXR must also release control of the relays to allow Taralist processing.

Event 225      Clear ProXR Relays and Priorities

This event changes the priority status of all relays, removing ProXR control so that Taralist or Reactor is allowed to handle relay control operations.  Taralist and Reactor have lower priority than ProXR, so removing ProXR control from the relays will allow Taralist or Reactor to have control of the relays.

Event 226      Clear Reactor and ProXR Relays and Priorities

This event combines the above two functions, removing all relay control priorities so Taralist may control relays as needed.

Event 227      Manually Refresh ProXR Relay Status

ProXR supports a feature called “Manual Refresh.”  Manual Refresh is used to refresh the state of all ProXR Relays.  By default, ProXR automatically refreshes ProXR relay banks.  If automatic refresh is disabled, users may send commands to control relays, but the relays will not change state unless a “Manual Refresh” command is sent to the Fusion controller.  This event does the same thing as the Manual Refresh command in ProXR and may be useful in applications where computer controlled relays should be refreshed by Reactor or Taralist.

Event 228      Reserved for Future Use

Event 229      Reserved for Future Use

Event 230      Reserved for Future Use

Event 231      Reserved for Future Use

Event 232      Reserved for Future Use

Event 233      Reserved for Future Use

Event 234      Reserved for Future Use

Event 235      Reboot Controller

This command reboots the Fusion controller, resetting all relays and priorities to the default power-up state.

Event 236      Copy 8-Bit Sensor Value Directly to Relay Bank 1

Event 237      Copy 8-Bit Sensor Value Directly to Relay Bank 2

Event 238      Copy 8-Bit Sensor Value Directly to Relay Bank 3

Event 239      Copy 8-Bit Sensor Value Directly to Relay Bank 4

In some applications, the 8-bit value of a sensor may be copied directly to a relay bank.  Most of the time, the 8-bit data source is an 8-bit digital input.  This event makes it easy to manually control relays based on the digital input of the Fusion controller.

Event 240      Trap Sensor

The Trap Sensor event is an experimental event used to trap the value of a sensor for a predefined period of time.  A Sensor Trap is useful in applications where a high-speed trigger on an input may be ignored by the Fusion controller unless it is trapped.  This event is experimental, and the way that it currently functions may evolve as we refine Fusion firmware. 

Analog Data Sources

Reactor is capable of reading analog data from various data sources.  With regard to Fusion controllers, analog data is limited to 0 to 5 Volts DC.  The process of analog to digital conversion is completely managed by the Fusion controller, converting this voltage to numeric values that can be monitored by Reactor.  Analog to Digital Conversion (ADC) makes it possible for Reactor to read the light levels in the room and activate relays accordingly.  Similarly, ADC allows Reactor to read temperature, humidity, moisture, sound levels, and much more.  There are many kinds of sensors that are compatible with Reactor ADC.

During configuration, you may see options for 8-bit, 10-bit, 12-bit or other resolutions of data sources.  Reading an analog data source at 8-bit resolution means Reactor is capable of reading a voltage from 0 to 5 volts converting it to a value from 0 to 255.  Reading an analog data source at 10-bit resolution means Reactor is capable of reading a voltage from 0 to 5 volts and converting it to a value from 0 to 1023.  Similarly, 12-bit resolution converts the incoming voltage to a value from 0 to 4095. 

The objective of ADC is to convert a sensor to a voltage and a voltage to a value.  Reactor works with these data values directly, making decisions based on the values.

Sensor input values are displayed in 16-bit resolution, but the actual values shown in the Sensor Inputs column is limited to the actual resolution of the data source.  The Sensor Inputs column may indicate values from 0 to 255; internally, the Reactor processing engine is looking at each value as though it were 16-bit resolution.

Once a value is established, this value may be “translated.”  Base Station software is capable of translating data sources so these 16-bit values have an actual meaning.  As we continue to evolve Base Station software, more translators and sensor types will be added, making these values much more user-friendly.

Analog data sources may be interpreted in different ways.  You can tell Reactor to interpret analog data as digital data if you want; however, the event triggers are not designed for analog data sources, so you may be very limited in terms of how events are actually triggered.

The above screen shot demonstrates a simple 8-bit analog data source that is converted to a voltage using the 8-Bit Analog Voltage translator. 

One limit is defined at a value of 100 (1.95 volts).  When the analog value equals or falls below 100, the “Events Triggered Below Limit” are executed.  When the Analog value goes above 100, four events are triggered in the “Events Triggered Above Limit” column.  Reactor is automatically smoothing the input using the “8Bit Analog with Data Smoothing” option.  Data smoothing may be turned off in applications that may require Reactor to instantly respond to analog changes.  Data Smoothing is the default option, making Reactor immune to occasional random voltage spikes that may be presented to the controller in electrically noisy installations.  In the sample above, a TLEE expansion module is NOT installed, so only two limits are possible for this data source.  With the TLEE expansion module installed, seven limits are possible.  Setting the Limits value to 0 turns off this evaluator.

The above screen shot demonstrates configuration of 12-Bit Analog Data Source.  Up to seven limits may be defined when the TLEE expansion module is installed. 

In this sample, a single relay will be activated as the sensor value increases or decreases.  Note:  RED indicates a configuration error.  If any element is highlighted in red, the configuration software will be unable to store any changes or settings that you make in real-time or when the window is closed.  It is important to resolve all errors as soon as possible so settings may be properly stored as changes are made to the configuration.  In the above sample, the value of 135 is highlighted because it exceeds Limit 3.  Limits are tested by the Reactor processor in ascending order, so it is critical to store all limit values in ascending order.  Users should also pay close attention to the footnotes below the events.  The first footnote reads “Events Triggered Below Limit 1.”  These footnotes indicate which event group will be triggered as the sensor values cross the user-defined limits.  Setting the Limits value to 0 turns off this evaluator. 

Digital Data Sources

Digital Data Sources are data sources that generally indicate an on/off condition.  Digital data sources are interpreted by Reactor using 8-bit resolution.  This allows Reactor to activate events based on eight individual on/off conditions.  Digital data sources are ideally used in applications where Reactor needs to monitor a switch, also known as a contact closure.  Reactor is capable of triggering events when a contact closure input changes state or on specific conditions.  The TLEE expansion module will greatly affect the number of events that may be triggered by a digital data source.

In this configuration example, any time a change is detected on any of the 8 digital inputs (B0 through B1), all relays will turn off and the state of Relay 9 will toggle.  A relay will activate corresponding to the digital input that is closed.  Digital inputs are generally On or Off (Closed or Open) and are represented by a 1 or 0 in the B0-B7 boxes.  This evaluator may be turned off using the Radio button in the upper left corner of the screen shown above.  Data interpretation is defaulted to 8-Bit Digital; we recommend not changing this setting for most applications.  This control panel is shown without the TLEE expansion module installed.  Installing the TLEE will greatly expand your options for digitally triggered events.

If the TLEE expansion module is installed, many more event triggers are available to the user.  In this configuration sample, eight digital inputs are represented by 1s and 0s in the B7-B0 boxes shown above.  Global Events are shown toward the top of the window.  Global events are triggered any time a digital value changes (right side) or any time the digital value matches a predefined input value (left side).  For your convenience, the decimal value of the digital data is also shown, along with the binary values.  When digital inputs reach predefined decimal values, the first four events in the upper left corner of this page are triggered.  Events may also be triggered if a particular digital input goes high or low.

Sensor Monitoring

If all goes well, you should have Reactor monitoring sensors configured correctly and triggering events as needed.  Sensor values should be changing on the Data Collector configuration page.  By now, you will have noticed references to trigger timers and counters.  The upcoming sections will show an in-depth look at how timers and counters can be used to greatly expand the capabilities of Reactor.

Step 3:  Counter Configuration

Counting is a very important capability for a Fusion controller.  Reactor has 16 counters, each capable of counting from 0 to 255.  Attached to each counter is a sequence.  There are 12 Rollover sequences and 12 Halt on Limits sequences.  As a counter increases or decreases, the sequence is shown as bit data on B7 through B0.  These bits may be copied directly to a relay bank, allowing relays to count in the sequences defined in this control panel.

A Rollover Counter is a counter that rolls back to the start when the count has exceeded its maximum range.  For instance, if the maximum range is 255, and the current count is 255, the counter will rollover to 0 (or whatever the minimum counter value is set to).  If the counter type is set to a “Halt Limits Counter,” the counter will stop on the limit, it will not exceed the limit, and it will not roll over to the minimum counter value.

The “Power-up Value” defines the default count position when the controller is powered on.

The TLEE expansion module does not affect counter configuration in any way.

Set the Counter Type using the drop-down menu options, and then increase/decrease the counter to view  the different counting sequences that are available.  Remember, these sequences may be completely or partially mapped to a group of relays, allowing the relays to count in the same sequences as shown on this page.  The presence of a TLEE expansion module does not affect the counting features of a Fusion Controller.

Step 4:  Timer Configuration

Reactor has 16 timers that may be triggered using various events.  All 16 timers are of the Count Down variety, meaning all timers will count down when triggered.  When a timer is triggered, Reactor will automatically load the preset values defined in the “Time when Triggered” boxes shown below.  Event options depend on whether you have the TLEE expansion module installed.

Timer configuration is shown above without the TLEE expansion module installed.  Every timer has two associated events.  As the timer counts, it is possible to trigger a single event every second the timer counts down.  While any event may be triggered in the “Event Triggered Every Second,” the development goal of this trigger was to increase or decrease a counter.  With this option, you can increase a counter that is attached to relays, easily creating a driveway light sequence effect.  When the timer counts down to zero, the “Event Triggered when Timer Expires” event is triggered.  This can be used to self-trigger the same timer over again or for triggering any of the events shown in the event list.  Users have the option to manually trigger and cancel timers shown on this page.

If the TLEE expansion module is installed, 12 total events may be triggered, greatly expanding the capabilities of timers.  Because of the extra event triggers, the user interface is split into two parts.

If the TLEE expansion module is installed, 12 total events may be triggered for every timer.  There are essentially three event triggers; each event trigger is capable of triggering four events.  With the TLEE installed, users can execute four events when a timer is triggered, four events may be triggered for every second a timer is running, and four events may be triggered when a timer expires.

Step 5:  Relay Connector

Relay Connector is used to attach a relay to a timer or a counter.  Up to 32 relays may be associated with Timers 1 to 16 and Counters 1 to 16.  This control panel makes it easy to force an association between timers, counters, and relays.  Using this control panel, it is possible to connect a relay to a timer so that a relay is on while the timer is on.  Also, a relay may be associated with a counter bit.  Up to eight counter bits are available for Counters 1 to 16.  These bits define the pattern in which relays are switched.  In this configuration control panel, bits 0 through 7 refer to B0 to B7 as described in the “Counters” section of this guide.

The Quick Configuration drop-down menu automatically attaches relays to counters, saving you a lot of pointing and clicking.  Sometimes it is quickest to attach relays to counters using Quick Configuration, and then modifying settings for timers or other specific settings.  Note: The settings in this control panel will override Taralist, in many cases, it will not be possible for Taralist to ever control these relays.

Overview

The Overview control panel helps you see how Reactor is functioning, giving you an overview of timers, counters, sensors, and relays all on a single page.  Use the Overview control panel should you ever experience any unpredictable behavior from the Fusion controller.

The Sensors column shows you all of the sensor values monitored by Reactor.  The B7 through B0 columns indicate the current count position of each counter (1 through 16).  Manually increase each counter using the “Test Counter” + and – buttons.  Timer values 1 through 16 are also shown on this page, along with “Trigger Timer” and “Cancel Timer” buttons, making it easy to see the interaction of timers with other Reactor features.  The Relay Status column shows the status of each relay, highlighting relays based on who has control of relays and which relays are active.

Push Notification

A Push Notification is a message sent to a computer from the Fusion controller.  Push notifications often contain sensor and relay status information to keep the computer updated on what the Fusion controller is doing, or to notify a computer of any sensor values that may be out of range.  Push notifications are triggered as a Reactor event, and may be triggered in the same method as any other Reactor event.  Because Reactor events may be triggered from a Taralist time schedule, Push notifications may be sent at specific times of the day.  A Push Notification consists of data bytes that may be sent out Port 1 or Port 2 on the Fusion controller.  It is not possible to send a Push Notification on Port 2 if Remote Access is configured.  Remote Access allows Fusion controllers to exchange data among each other, whereas Push Notification should only be used to send data from a Fusion controller to a user or server.

Push notifications have a few customization variables that indicate the data content of a Push Notification.  A Push Notification may consist of only a few bytes of data or as much as 44 bytes of data, depending on the options you have chosen.  The Push Notification Setup window does not really have too many user-configured options, despite the size of the window.  This configuration control panel uses most of its screen space demonstrating the organization of a Push Notification data packet, greatly simplifying software development for interpreting Fusion Push Notification data packets.

Push notifications are configured using a few checks to indicate data that is to be included in the data packet.  Header Bytes 1 through 4 shown above may be used for anything or to help identify the controller that sent the Push Notification.  Push notifications can be sent to Port 1 or Port 2.  Port 2 will be unavailable if your Fusion controller is configured for Remote Access.  Use Reactor events to trigger push notifications.  Taralist is capable of triggering Reactor events.

Lifetime Counters

A Lifetime Counter is a 32-Bit counter used to keep track of the cycle life of a mechanical device.  Lifetime Counters may be used to track how many times a relay has been activated, how many times a motor has cycled, or how many times a light has been turned on.  Lifetime Counters automatically backup their values into non-volatile EEPROM memory.  Anytime a Fusion controller is rebooted, the Lifetime counter is automatically saved.  To avoid damaging the non-volatile EEPROM inside the controller, only changes are stored.  Fusion 4 controllers have four lifetime counters available.  Base Station software may be used to read the current value of each of the Lifetime counters.  Additionally, Base Station can be used to manually increase or clear a Lifetime Counter back to 0.  It is not possible to decrease a Lifetime counter.

Lifetime Counters are a Reactor class function.  As such, Reactor has the ability to increase a Lifetime counter using standard Reactor events.  Because Taralist is capable of triggering Reactor events, a Lifetime counter can be increased on a regular time schedule.

The default Lifetime Counter values shown above illustrate the potential size of a 32-bit counter.  These values are offered for demonstration purposes only and should be cleared using the “Reset Lifetime Counter” buttons.  Rebooting the Fusion controller will save changes to the current lifetime counter values.

Programming for Reactor

Software developers who need to speak to the Reactor features of a Fusion controller have many commands at their disposal.  Base Station software was developed in combination with the rules of a Fusion controller, and should always be used for device configuration.  Base Station software interacts with nonvolatile EEPROM memory locations within the Fusion CPU.  Fusion is constantly interpreting EEPROM settings.  As changes are made, the Fusion CPU adapts instantly to the new settings.  We do not encourage users to modify EEPROM memory outside the context of Base Station software.  However, for those customers who may need to alter EEPROM memory, we will share our Base Station software source code upon request.

Please note that EEPROM memory should never be altered more than 1,000,000 times in your software.  Doing so will permanently damage the EEPROM memory.  Constant EEPROM writes in a main program loop are prohibited.  Make changes to EEPROM memory only when necessary to ensure a long life of the Fusion controller.

As you may have noticed, some Base Station screens have a “More” button available in the upper right corner of the form.  This “More” button should be used extensively by software developers so that they can examine the commands issued to the Fusion controller.  The commands shown in Base Station software supersede the commands shown in this document as documentation trails behind development.  The “More” button will not appear on forms that do not offer any user-level commands.

Before developing software for the Fusion controller, the API Codec Quick Start Guide should be considered REQUIRED reading.  The commands shown in this document are not encoded, and must be API Encoded before Fusion will properly interpret them.

Reactor Command Reference (Decimal Format)

The following Reactor commands may be used to communicate with the Reactor portion of the Fusion controller.  If you experience any problems with the command shown, please use the “More” button in Base Station software to generate these commands.  This will demonstrate the API Encoding required by the Fusion series controllers.

235 1 0 Increase Lifetime Counter 1 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB
235 2 0 Increase Lifetime Counter 2 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB
235 3 0 Increase Lifetime Counter 3 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB
235 4 0 Increase Lifetime Counter 4 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB

235 1 2 Reset Lifetime Counter 1 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB 0 0 0 0
235 2 2 Reset Lifetime Counter 2 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB 0 0 0 0
235 3 2 Reset Lifetime Counter 3 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB 0 0 0 0
235 4 2 Reset Lifetime Counter 4 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB 0 0 0 0

254 33 140 99 Reboot Fusion Controller Rx: No Response

233 104 Load Reactor EEPROM to SRAM Rx: 85

This command is not typically used by customers, but if you are developing your own configuration program, this function should be called after changing EEPROM values in the Fusion controller.  This command will load your EEPROM settings into static RAM, causing your changes to take effect immediately.  If you plan to reboot the controller, this function is not necessary. 

233 245 0 Turn Off Reactor Remote Data Collection Rx: 85

233 245 1 Turn On Reactor Remote Data Collection Rx: 85

233 246 Turn Off Reactor Processing* Rx: 85

233 246 1 Request On/Off Status of Reactor Rx: 0=Off 1=On

233 247 Turn On Reactor Processing* Rx: 85

233 247 1 Request On/Off Status of Reactor Rx: 0=Off 1=On

*This Command Modifies EEPROM and will affect the default power-up state of Reactor

Reactor Command Reference (Hexadecimal Format)

The following Reactor commands may be used to communicate with the Reactor portion of the Fusion controller.  If you experience any problems with the command shown, please use the “More” button in Base Station software to generate these commands.  This will demonstrate the API Encoding required by the Fusion series controllers in hexadecimal format.

0xEB 0x01 0x00 Increase Lifetime Counter 1 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB
0xEB 0x02 0x00 Increase Lifetime Counter 2 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB
0xEB 0x03 0x00 Increase Lifetime Counter 3 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB
0xEB 0x04 0x00 Increase Lifetime Counter 4 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB

0xEB 0x01 0x02 Reset Lifetime Counter 1 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB 0 0 0 0
0xEB 0x02 0x02 Reset Lifetime Counter 2 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB 0 0 0 0
0xEB 0x03 0x02 Reset Lifetime Counter 3 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB 0 0 0 0
0xEB 0x04 0x02 Reset Lifetime Counter 4 Rx: LSB1 LSB2 LSB3 MSB 0 0 0 0

0xFE 0x21 0x8C 0x63 Reboot Fusion Controller Rx: No Response

0xE9 0x68 Load Reactor EEPROM to SRAM Rx: 0x55

This command is not typically used by customers, but if you are developing your own configuration program, this function should be called after changing EEPROM values in the Fusion controller.  This command will load your EEPROM settings into static RAM, causing your changes to take effect immediately.  If you plan to reboot the controller, this function is not necessary. 

0xE9 0xF5 0x00 Turn Off Reactor Remote Data Collection Rx: 0x55

0xE9 0xF5 0x01 Turn On Reactor Remote Data Collection Rx: 0x55

0xE9 0xF6 Turn Off Reactor Processing* Rx: 0x55

0xE9 0xF6 0x01 Request On/Off Status of Reactor Rx: 0=Off 1=On

0xE9 0xF7 Turn On Reactor Processing* Rx: 0x55

0xE9 0xF7 0x01 Request On/Off Status of Reactor Rx: 0=Off 1=On

*This Command Modifies EEPROM and will affect the default power-up state of Reactor

For the following commands, the hexadecimal equivalent will be listed below the decimal version.

Dec: 233 100

Hex: 0xE9 0x64

Returns 32 Bytes of Data as Follows:

Sensor 1 MSB Value

Sensor 1 LSB Value

Sensor 2 MSB Value

Sensor 2 LSB Value

Sensor 3 MSB Value

Sensor 3 LSB Value

Sensor 4 MSB Value

Sensor 4 LSB Value

Sensor 5 MSB Value

Sensor 5 LSB Value

Sensor 6 MSB Value

Sensor 6 LSB Value

Sensor 7 MSB Value

Sensor 7 LSB Value

Sensor 8 MSB Value

Sensor 8 LSB Value

Sensor 9 MSB Value

Sensor 9 LSB Value

Sensor 10 MSB Value

Sensor 10 LSB Value

Sensor 11 MSB Value

Sensor 11 LSB Value

Sensor 12 MSB Value

Sensor 12 LSB Value

Sensor 13 MSB Value

Sensor 13 LSB Value

Sensor 14 MSB Value

Sensor 14 LSB Value

Sensor 15 MSB Value

Sensor 15 LSB Value

Sensor 16 MSB Value

Sensor 16 LSB Value

Dec: 233 106 0

Hex: 0xE9 0x6A 0x00

Returns 16 Bytes of Data as Follows:

Byte 1 Timer 1 Hours

Byte 2 Timer 2 Hours

Byte 3 Timer 3 Hours

Byte 4 Timer 4 Hours

Byte 5 Timer 5 Hours

Byte 6 Timer 6 Hours

Byte 7 Timer 7 Hours

Byte 8 Timer 8 Hours

Byte 9 Timer 9 Hours

Byte 10 Timer 10 Hours

Byte 11 Timer 11 Hours

Byte 12 Timer 12 Hours

Byte 13 Timer 13 Hours

Byte 14 Timer 14 Hours

Byte 15 Timer 15 Hours

Byte 16 Timer 16 Hours

Dec: 233 106 3 

Hex: 0xE9 0x6A 0x03

Returns 32 Bytes of Data as Follows:

Byte 1 Timer 1 Minutes

Byte 2 Timer 2 Minutes

Byte 3 Timer 3 Minutes

Byte 4 Timer 4 Minutes

Byte 5 Timer 5 Minutes

Byte 6 Timer 6 Minutes

Byte 7 Timer 7 Minutes

Byte 8 Timer 8 Minutes

Byte 9 Timer 9 Minutes

Byte 10 Timer 10 Minutes

Byte 11 Timer 11 Minutes

Byte 12 Timer 12 Minutes

Byte 13 Timer 13 Minutes

Byte 14 Timer 14 Minutes

Byte 15 Timer 15 Minutes

Byte 16 Timer 16 Minutes

Byte 17 Timer 1 Seconds

Byte 18 Timer 2 Seconds

Byte 19 Timer 3 Seconds

Byte 20 Timer 4 Seconds

Byte 21 Timer 5 Seconds

Byte 22 Timer 6 Seconds

Byte 23 Timer 7 Seconds

Byte 24 Timer 8 Seconds

Byte 25 Timer 9 Seconds

Byte 26 Timer 10 Seconds

Byte 27 Timer 11 Seconds

Byte 28 Timer 12 Seconds

Byte 29 Timer 13 Seconds

Byte 30 Timer 14 Seconds

Byte 31 Timer 15 Seconds

Byte 32 Timer 16 Seconds

Dec: 233 101 6

Hex: 0xE9 0x65 0x06

Returns 32 Bytes of Data as Follows:

Byte 1 Counter 1 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 2 Counter 2 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 3 Counter 3 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 4 Counter 4 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 5 Counter 5 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 6 Counter 6 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 7 Counter 7 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 8 Counter 8 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 9 Counter 9 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 10 Counter 10 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 11 Counter 11 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 12 Counter 12 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 13 Counter 13 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 14 Counter 14 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 15 Counter 15 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 16 Counter 16 Value (Binary Pattern Value)

Byte 17 Counter 1 Raw Value

Byte 18 Counter 2 Raw Value

Byte 19 Counter 3 Raw Value

Byte 20 Counter 4 Raw Value

Byte 21 Counter 5 Raw Value

Byte 22 Counter 6 Raw Value

Byte 23 Counter 7 Raw Value

Byte 24 Counter 8 Raw Value

Byte 25 Counter 9 Raw Value

Byte 26 Counter 10 Raw Value

Byte 27 Counter 11 Raw Value

Byte 28 Counter 12 Raw Value

Byte 29 Counter 13 Raw Value

Byte 30 Counter 14 Raw Value

Byte 31 Counter 15 Raw Value

Byte 32 Counter 16 Raw Value

Dec: 254 124 0 99

Hex: 0xFE 0x7C 0x00 0x63

Returns 28 Bytes of Data as Follows:

Byte 1 ProXR Bank 1 Status

Byte 2 ProXR Bank 2 Status

Byte 3 ProXR Bank 3 Status

Byte 4 ProXR Bank 4 Status

Byte 5 Reactor Bank 1 Status

Byte 6 Reactor Bank 2 Status

Byte 7 Reactor Bank 3 Status

Byte 8 Reactor Bank 4 Status

Byte 9 Taralist Bank 1 Status

Byte 10 Taralist Bank 2 Status

Byte 11 Taralist Bank 3 Status

Byte 12 Taralist Bank 4 Status

Byte 13 Override Bank 1 Status *

Byte 14 Override Bank 2 Status *

Byte 15 Override Bank 3 Status *

Byte 16 Override Bank 4 Status *

Byte 17 Override 2 Bank 1 Status *

Byte 18 Override 2 Bank 2 Status *

Byte 19 Override 2 Bank 3 Status *

Byte 20 Override 2 Bank 3 Status *

Byte 21 Mask 1 Bank 1 Status *

Byte 22 Mask 1 Bank 2 Status *

Byte 23 Mask 1 Bank 3 Status *

Byte 24 Mask 1 Bank 4 Status *

Byte 25 Mask 2 Bank 1 Status *

Byte 26 Mask 2 Bank 2 Status *

Byte 27 Mask 2 Bank 3 Status *

Byte 28 Mask 2 Bank 4 Status *

*See Base Station source code

Trigger Reactor Events:

The following command is used to manually Trigger Reactor Events.  The Fusion controller will respond with 85 after the event has been processed.

Tx: 233 108 <Event Number Shown Below> Hex: 0xE9

Rx: 85 0x55

Event 1       Increase Counter 1

Event 2       Increase Counter 2

Event 3       Increase Counter 3

Event 4       Increase Counter 4

Event 5       Increase Counter 5

Event 6       Increase Counter 6

Event 7       Increase Counter 7

Event 8       Increase Counter 8

Event 9       Increase Counter 9

Event 10      Increase Counter 10

Event 11      Increase Counter 11

Event 12      Increase Counter 12

Event 13      Increase Counter 13

Event 14      Increase Counter 14

Event 15      Increase Counter 15

Event 16      Increase Counter 16

Event 17      Decrease Counter 1

Event 18      Decrease Counter 2

Event 19      Decrease Counter 3

Event 20      Decrease Counter 4

Event 21      Decrease Counter 5

Event 22      Decrease Counter 6

Event 23      Decrease Counter 7

Event 24      Decrease Counter 8

Event 25      Decrease Counter 9

Event 26      Decrease Counter 10

Event 27      Decrease Counter 11

Event 28      Decrease Counter 12

Event 29      Decrease Counter 13

Event 30      Decrease Counter 14

Event 31      Decrease Counter 15

Event 32      Decrease Counter 16

Event 33      Reset Counter 1

Event 34      Reset Counter 2

Event 35      Reset Counter 3

Event 36      Reset Counter 4

Event 37      Reset Counter 5

Event 38      Reset Counter 6

Event 39      Reset Counter 7

Event 40      Reset Counter 8

Event 41      Reset Counter 9

Event 42      Reset Counter 10

Event 43      Reset Counter 11

Event 44      Reset Counter 12

Event 45      Reset Counter 13

Event 46      Reset Counter 14

Event 47      Reset Counter 15

Event 48      Reset Counter 16

Event 49      Trigger Timer 1

Event 50      Trigger Timer 2

Event 51      Trigger Timer 3

Event 52      Trigger Timer 4

Event 53      Trigger Timer 5

Event 54      Trigger Timer 6

Event 55      Trigger Timer 7

Event 56      Trigger Timer 8

Event 57      Trigger Timer 9

Event 58      Trigger Timer 10

Event 59      Trigger Timer 11

Event 60      Trigger Timer 12

Event 61      Trigger Timer 13

Event 62      Trigger Timer 14

Event 63      Trigger Timer 15

Event 64      Trigger Timer 16

Event 65      Cancel Timer 1

Event 66      Cancel Timer 2

Event 67      Cancel Timer 3

Event 68      Cancel Timer 4

Event 69      Cancel Timer 5

Event 70      Cancel Timer 6

Event 71      Cancel Timer 7

Event 72      Cancel Timer 8

Event 73      Cancel Timer 9

Event 74      Cancel Timer 10

Event 75      Cancel Timer 11

Event 76      Cancel Timer 12

Event 77      Cancel Timer 13

Event 78      Cancel Timer 14

Event 79      Cancel Timer 15

Event 80      Cancel Timer 16

Event 81      Turn On Relay 1

Event 82      Turn On Relay 2

Event 83      Turn On Relay 3

Event 84      Turn On Relay 4

Event 85      Turn On Relay 5

Event 86      Turn On Relay 6

Event 87      Turn On Relay 7

Event 88      Turn On Relay 8

Event 89      Turn On Relay 9

Event 90      Turn On Relay 10

Event 91      Turn On Relay 11

Event 92      Turn On Relay 12

Event 93      Turn On Relay 13

Event 94      Turn On Relay 14

Event 95      Turn On Relay 15

Event 96      Turn On Relay 16

Event 97       Turn On Relay 17

Event 98       Turn On Relay 18

Event 99       Turn On Relay 19

Event 100      Turn On Relay 20

Event 101      Turn On Relay 21

Event 102      Turn On Relay 22

Event 103      Turn On Relay 23

Event 104      Turn On Relay 24

Event 105      Turn On Relay 25

Event 106      Turn On Relay 26

Event 107      Turn On Relay 27

Event 108      Turn On Relay 28

Event 109      Turn On Relay 29

Event 110      Turn On Relay 30

Event 111      Turn On Relay 31

Event 112      Turn On Relay 32

Event 113      Turn Off Relay 1

Event 114      Turn Off Relay 2

Event 115      Turn Off Relay 3

Event 116      Turn Off Relay 4

Event 117      Turn Off Relay 5

Event 118      Turn Off Relay 6

Event 119      Turn Off Relay 7

Event 120      Turn Off Relay 8

Event 121      Turn Off Relay 9

Event 122      Turn Off Relay 10

Event 123      Turn Off Relay 11

Event 124      Turn Off Relay 12

Event 125      Turn Off Relay 13

Event 126      Turn Off Relay 14

Event 127      Turn Off Relay 15

Event 128      Turn Off Relay 16

Event 129      Turn Off Relay 17

Event 130      Turn Off Relay 18

Event 131      Turn Off Relay 19

Event 132      Turn Off Relay 20

Event 133      Turn Off Relay 21

Event 134      Turn Off Relay 22

Event 135      Turn Off Relay 23

Event 136      Turn Off Relay 24

Event 137      Turn Off Relay 25

Event 138      Turn Off Relay 26

Event 139      Turn Off Relay 27

Event 140      Turn Off Relay 28

Event 141      Turn Off Relay 29

Event 142      Turn Off Relay 30

Event 143      Turn Off Relay 31

Event 144      Turn Off Relay 32

Event 145      Toggle the State of Relay 1

Event 146      Toggle the State of Relay 2

Event 147      Toggle the State of Relay 3

Event 148      Toggle the State of Relay 4

Event 149      Toggle the State of Relay 5

Event 150      Toggle the State of Relay 6

Event 151      Toggle the State of Relay 7

Event 152      Toggle the State of Relay 8

Event 153      Toggle the State of Relay 9

Event 154      Toggle the State of Relay 10

Event 155      Toggle the State of Relay 11

Event 156      Toggle the State of Relay 12

Event 157      Toggle the State of Relay 13

Event 158      Toggle the State of Relay 14

Event 159      Toggle the State of Relay 15

Event 160      Toggle the State of Relay 16

Event 161      Toggle the State of Relay 17

Event 162      Toggle the State of Relay 18

Event 163      Toggle the State of Relay 19

Event 164      Toggle the State of Relay 20

Event 165      Toggle the State of Relay 21

Event 166      Toggle the State of Relay 22

Event 167      Toggle the State of Relay 23

Event 168      Toggle the State of Relay 24

Event 169      Toggle the State of Relay 25

Event 170      Toggle the State of Relay 26

Event 171      Toggle the State of Relay 27

Event 172      Toggle the State of Relay 28

Event 173      Toggle the State of Relay 29

Event 174      Toggle the State of Relay 30

Event 175      Toggle the State of Relay 31

Event 176      Toggle the State of Relay 32

Event 177      Flash Relay 1

Event 178      Flash Relay 2

Event 179      Flash Relay 3

Event 180      Flash Relay 4

Event 181      Flash Relay 5

Event 182      Flash Relay 6

Event 183      Flash Relay 7

Event 184      Flash Relay 8

Event 185      Flash Relay 9

Event 186      Flash Relay 10

Event 187      Flash Relay 11

Event 188      Flash Relay 12

Event 189      Flash Relay 13

Event 190      Flash Relay 14

Event 191      Flash Relay 15

Event 192      Flash Relay 16

Event 193      Cancel Flash Relay 1

Event 194      Cancel Flash Relay 2

Event 195      Cancel Flash Relay 3

Event 196      Cancel Flash Relay 4

Event 197      Cancel Flash Relay 5

Event 198      Cancel Flash Relay 6

Event 199      Cancel Flash Relay 7

Event 200      Cancel Flash Relay 8

Event 201      Cancel Flash Relay 9

Event 202      Cancel Flash Relay 10

Event 203      Cancel Flash Relay 11

Event 204      Cancel Flash Relay 12

Event 205      Cancel Flash Relay 13

Event 206      Cancel Flash Relay 14

Event 207      Cancel Flash Relay 15

Event 208      Cancel Flash Relay 16

Event 209      Turn Off All Relays in Bank 1

Event 210      Turn Off All Relays in Bank 2

Event 211      Turn Off All Relays in Bank 3

Event 212      Turn Off All Relays in Bank 4

Event 213      Turn On All Relays in Bank 1

Event 214      Turn On All Relays in Bank 2

Event 215      Turn On All Relays in Bank 3

Event 216      Turn On All Relays in Bank 4

Event 217      Increase Lifetime Counter 1

Event 218      Increase Lifetime Counter 2

Event 219      Increase Lifetime Counter 3

Event 220      Increase Lifetime Counter 4

Event 221      Send Push Notification

Event 222      Halt Taralist Processing

Event 223      Resume Taralist Processing

Event 224      Clear Reactor Relays and Priorities

Event 225      Clear ProXR Relays and Priorities

Event 226      Clear Reactor and ProXR Relays and Priorities

Event 227      Manually Refresh ProXR Relay Status

Event 235      Reboot Controller

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To learn something new, take the path that you took yesterday. ~John Burroughs

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