Category: ProXR Quick Start Guide

Device Identification

ProXR controllers are available in many varieties.  The following commands can help identify the ProXR controller and feature set available. Each Device ID Byte above contains a very specific meaning, indicating available features for the controller.  It will be necessary to test each bit of every byte to obtain the complete feature set.  If you are not familiar with bitwise operations, examples are available in the Base Station Source Code at https://ncd.io/start Device ID Byte 1 In the example Shown, the device returned &h63. Convert the value &h63 to Binary to See Each Bit: %01100011 (8-Bit Binary Always Begins with

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UXP Expansion Port

Select ProXR series controllers that contain UXP in the part number include a UXP expansion port.  These controllers have different firmware that support compatible UXP expansion boards, allowing you to add Contact Closure Inputs, Potentiometer Outputs, and High-Resolution Analog to Digital Converters.  This section of our tutorial will demonstrate each of the expansion boards, and the commands associated with these expansions.  Please note that only one type of expansion is permitted on the UXP port.  For instance, if you choose Contact Closure inputs, then all expansions most be a contact closure input.  It is not possible to mix expansion types on the

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UXP Contact Closure Input Expansion

The UXP expansion port found on ProXR series controllers (equipped with a UXP port) support contact closure inputs.  These controllers allow you to connect buttons, switches, motion detectors, or any other type of contact closure input to your relay controller.  UXP series controllers are able to be read the contact closure inputs based on a polled protocol.  Polling is the process of asking the controller the current state of the contact closure inputs and receiving a reply.  Push notification is not supported for any UXP expansions.  Since inputs on this expansion will not accept voltages on the inputs, users should exercise

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UXP Analog to Digital Conversion (8/12-Bit)

The UXP expansion port found on ProXR series controllers (equipped with a UXP port) support up to 48 Channels of Analog to Digital Conversion with 12-Bit resolution.  These controllers allow you to read analog voltages from 0 to 5VDC, ideal for sensor monitoring applications.  UXP series controllers are able to be read ADC inputs based on a polled protocol.  Polling is the process of asking the controller the current voltage on any of the inputs and receiving a reply.  Push notification is not supported for any UXP expansions.  Users should exercise caution not to exceed 5VDC on any of the analog inputs

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UXP Digital Potentiometers (8-Bit)

The UXP expansion port found on ProXR series controllers (equipped with a UXP port) support the ability to control digital potentiometers.  Use the digital pot expansion boards for tuning of external analog circuits, audio control applications, or scientific control and simulation applications.  Digital potentiometers offer 8-bit resolution with the ability to control many channels individually or simultaneously.  Digital potentiometer outputs are available in 10K, 50K, and 100K ohm resistance.  Digital potentiometers are limited to working with analog circuits in the 0 to 5V range, and are current limited to 1ma per channel.  Exceeding the voltage or current on any of the potentiometers

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Relay Timer Samples Control Panel

The “Relay Timer Samples” control panel demonstrates a few use case scenarios for timers.  This control panel does not introduce any new commands, and is intended for demonstration purposes only.

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Program/Run Jumper: Configuration and Run Modes

ProXR Controllers have two modes of operation: Configuration and Run Run Mode is for daily use.  Your controller should remain in Run Mode most of the time, as this will prevent writing to the internal EEPROM memory, which could accidentally change important settings that could result in a complete loss of communications. Configuration Mode unlocks important sections of memory, allowing settings to be altered. There are two ways to change modes on ProXR series controllers: Software and Hardware Changing modes in hardware is very easy, simply move the PGM/RUN jumper to the desired setting. Changing modes in software requires you

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Simulating Larger Relays with Smaller Relays

Relay grouping commands can help you save money, and in some cases, a lot of money.  Simulating large expensive relays with smaller low-cost relays is an excellent way to provide greater functionality at a much lower cost point.  Relay grouping is the process of controlling relays in groups rather than individual relays.  For instance, we do not offer 20-Amp DPDT relay.  Locating such a relay may be impossible or expensive, so instead, you can simulate a 20-Amp DPDT relay using two 20-Amp SPDT relays for a much more reasonable and accessible price.  Another common request we receive is a 10-Amp

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Scratchpad Memory

Scratchpad Memory is used to store 8 user defined bytes of data.  Scratchpad Memory can be used for anything, such as a location, serial number, or other type of identifier.  The values stored do not affect the operation of the controller, as this memory is specifically for user-defined purposes.  Please note, the controller MUST be set to Configuration mode to write to Scratchpad Memory.  The following commands will demonstrate reading and writing data from scratchpad memory.  Memory Location (L) and the return Value (V) are identified in the table below: The following commands demonstrate how to write data to Scratchpad

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Relay Grouping Commands

The following relay grouping commands can be used to activate relays in groups, simulating DPDT, 3PDT, 4DPDT, and up to 8PDT relays using low-cost SPDT relays.  Note the Neighbor Parameter (N) has a maximum allowed value of 7.  Also note the (N) value cannot extend into the next bank.  For instance, Relay 1 has up to 7 neighbors, but Relay 8 has no neighbors because Relay number 9 is located in the next relay bank (Bank 2).  Here is a table of Neighbors allowed for each relay: Here are a few examples that properly apply neighbors:

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